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LIBRARY OF 



LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



19. . . . 



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658 lI/a5l?iQ($top 5treet, opposit(? BoylstOQ 5t., Boston. 



(3) 



L. P. Hollander & Co. 



Boston : Boylston St. Park Sq. 
New York: 290 Fifth Ave. 

Order Departments : 

COSTUMES, 
RIDING HABITS, 
COATS, 
MILLINERY. 



Newport : Casino Building. 
Paris Office : 21 Rue Bergere. 



Ready-Made Departments : 

MANTLES, COATS, 
TRAVELLING WRAPS, 
DRESSES AND SKIRTS, t^^^::£'^ 
TRIMMED HATS. 



GLOVES. — Our Special Makes. 

New England Agents for FASSO CORSETS. 



FINE DRESS GOODS 



IN EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS. 



OUR HOUSE IS CELEBRATED FOR ITS DISTINCTIVE TASTE AND LEADING IDEAS 

ON FASHIONS. 

(3) 



Cobb, (JldricI) Cf Co. 



THE ELEGANT NEW STORE, 



WASHINOTON AND KNKELAND SXRKKTS, 



Situated in the corner of our elegant new store, between the two main entrances is our Confectionery 
Department, which is one of the largest and the handsomest of any in this City. This is fully stocked with 

^^rKE5l1 <CONrECTIONEKY:^ 

OF OUR OWN MANUFACTURE, 

including all kinds of the finest French Candies, Nougatines, Bavarian, St. Nicholas, Montevideo, Nanon, 
Operas, Chocolate Covered Caramels, Opera Caramels, Crystallized French Fruits, etc. Also the more 
common kinds. All of which are strictly and absolutely pure, and sold at moderate prices. 



THE FINEST GROCERY STORE IN AMERICA. 



Cobb, Aldrich & Co. 



Boston. 

(4) 



THE OLD RELIABLE DRY GOODS HOUSE OF WALTHAM. 

Carries the Largest and Most Complete Stock of Legitimate Dry Goods in the City. 



CLOAKS, DRESS GOODS, 

LAV/NS, MOUSSELINS, 
CHALLIES, SATINES, 
CAMBRICS, GINGHAMS, 



PRINTS and OUTINGS. 




CORSETS, KID GLOVES, 
SKIRTS, UNDERWEAR, 
RIBBONS, LACES, 
SMALL ^VARES, 



YARNS and WORSTEDS. 



AND ALL SEASONABLE GOODS. ALWAYS CHANGING AND ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW. 



ROYAL STAINLESS 

Absolutely Fast Black and Royal 
Dye 

HOSIERY, 




I 



For LADIES, 
GENTS, 
BOYS and 
GIRLS. 

BLACKS, TANS, MODES, REDS, AND 
FANCIES. 



TRADE-MARK 

AS THE BEST FABRIC AND THE MOST RELIABLE DYE IN THE WORLD. 

POPULAR PRICES PREVAIL IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 



167-171 MOODY STREET. 

COR- OF SPRUCE ST. 



C. F. LAMB. 



(5) 






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(6) 



GEORGE R. McFARUN, 



DEALER IN 



AND 



CHINA. 
GLASS 
ROTTERY 



OF ALL COUNTRIES. 



39 FRANKUN STREET, COR. HAWLEY, 



BOSTON. 



LADIES 



WISHING TO PURCHASE THE CORRECT 
STYLES IN 

•:••:••:• MILLINERY, •••••.'••:• 



AT LOWEST PRICES, SHOULD 
CALL AT THE . . . , 



BOUQUET, 

134. Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO MOURNING ORDERS. 

. . . FOR . . . 

pretty atjd 5tyHsl;) JVIilHt^ery^ 

GO TO 

NIRS. J. J. ORACK, 



ba jVlode^ 



26 temple: place. 



FOR 



FINE MILLINERY 



iiaMBMaMBiiiiiiiiliillllDlllllilii 



. . . VISIT . . 



GEO. M. WETHERN, 

21 AND 23 ' 

TEMPLE PLACE. 



STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS GOODS AT POPULAR PRICES. 



ALL THE LATEST NOVELTIES 



FINE MILLINERY 

Are sfiowH on our counters as soon as in Paris , London or Berlin Market. 
Your patronage is respectfully solicited. 

CEO. M. WETHERN. 



LAMPS? 



Yes, lots of them. 

Big lamps to stand on the 

floor. 

Medium sized lamps to put 

on tables. 

Little lamps to g:o and sit in 

a corner with when you 

don't feel sociable. 

All these and many niore. 



Buy one if you want to make 

your room attractive. 

Never before was there such 

variety of design or such beauty 

of execution. 

Never were the shades so 

artistic. 

Never were the prices so low^. 

Come and see. 



nlr ilf "1 "(Jt 

R. HOLLINGS & CO, 

Manufacturers and Importers, 

523=525 WASHINGTON ST. 

Opposite Jt. H. White & Co's. 



(7) 



OUTING SUITS. 

. . . THE LATEST STYLES AT 

MODERATE PRICES 

SPECIAL TERMS FOR 

CLASS OR CLUB OUTFITS. . . 

BLOUSE WAISTS. 



GRADUATION 
DRESSES. 

* 

SPECIAL TERMS TO 

CLASSES FOR GRADUATION 
DRESSES TO ORDER 

DRESS GOODS. 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF THE VERY LATEST PARIS AND LONDON 

NOVELTIES, AND ARE ALWAYS GLAD TO SEND SAMPLES. IT WILL BE WORTH 
WHILE FOR YOU TO REMEMBER THIS AFTER YOU ARE AT HOME 



R. H. Stearns & C^ 

TREMONT STREET AND TEIVIPLE PLACE, 

BOSTON. 

(8) 






YOUNGS 
HSTEL 



AND 



Parker 

liaUSE 



BOSTON. 

cJ. R. WnippLE & Co. 

Proprietors. 



A. O. JENKINS & CO. 



AT REDUCED PRICES. 




LADIES' ENGLISH p.*' ERENCM 



Walkii;)g J^ats. 






407 WASHINGTON STREET. 



Boston. 



(9) 



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The Central Dry Goods Co., of Waltham, desires an 

introduction to the Young Ladies of Lasell Seminary. The 

object is the financial advancennent of both. Our ainn is to 
secure the newest and best goods for ladies' wear. Our Spe= 
cialties are : Jackets and Capes, dainty Laces, and Ham= 
burgs, the finest Underwear and Hosiery produced, the 
newest and best-fitting Gloves, and in our Shoe Department 
the handsomest styles designed in leather. 

We do not offer high grade goods at the price of low 
grade, nor does any other house, but we do offer thenn at the 
lowest possible prices, quality considered. 

After a pleasant ride on the electric cars, any conductor 
will gladly show you where we are. 

Central Dry Goods Co. 

107, 109, 113 Moody Street, Waltham. 



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(lO) 




1893 



AbliCRLiEl 



VOLUME III A> 



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S««SJ« 



LIbJRARY 



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AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

1893 



Pies' 




EDWARD LASELL, 

Prafessar of ChEmistry, VJilliams CollEge. 
FOUNDER OF LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 




CHARLES C, BRAGDON, 

Present Principal, 



53^ 



DEDICATION. 



ONCE upon a Monday dreary, while I 
pondered, weak and weary. 
O'er the soon to be forthcoming vol- 
ume of the AUerlei, 
While I groaned (I was not napping, I assure 

you) came a tapping, 
As of some belated maiden, rapping at my 

chamber door ; 
" 'Tis some visitor," I muttered, " tapping at my 
chamber door ; 

Only this and nothing more." 

Up I raised my head and grumbled, " Oh, come 

in" ("Stay out," I mumbled 
'Twixt my teeth) . Headlong there stumbled in 

through my half-open door, 
In her rode de nuit enfolded, careless how she 

would be scolded, 
All unlike the fair and stately maiden of the 

days of 3'ore, 
One who shall in these fair pages 

Nameless be for evermore ; 



Perched upon my desk before me: ''I've a new 

thought." Then I tore me 
From my labors. " Speak out quickly ! Tell, oh, 

tell me, I implore. 
Is he found for whom we're searching, thou who 

on my desk art perching? 
Tell me what his lordly name is who most 

worthy of this fame is. 
Worthy of the dedication of this learned, mystic 

lore, — 

Tell me this if nothing more." 



Then this maiden, smiling sweetly, slipped from 

off the desk most featly, 
Placed within my hand a picture of a tall and 

handsome scion 
Of the house that evermore 
All the great round world shall cherish, while 

America shall flourish. 
And the strains of " Hail CoUunbia " echo on 

Time's stormy shore, — 



The Duke of Veragua of Cristoval de Larreategui y de la Cerda, 
lineal descendant of Christopher Columbus. 

To this honored guest of our dear country, in the year of grace 
eighteen hundred and ninety-three, in which America's discovery 
is celebrated by the great Columbian Exposition at Chicago, we 
dedicate 

OUR ALLERLEI. 



(i6) 



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PREFACE. 



IT is done. The satisfaction of a work performed is ours. We have made no 
promises, and so, to our intense satisfaction, we have none to fulfil, but present 
this, the youngest of the noble AUerlei family, to the public, bespeaking for it their 
most inaudible grumblings (if any) and their hearty welcome. 

We wish to be strictly impartial, and in order to be so our arrow flights must 
either be aimed indiscriminately at the foibles of each and all, or our praise plasters 
applied with the same gentle judgment. At such a time one longs to read, in advance, 
a page or two out of Futurity's book. Could we only foresee the reception to be accorded 
to this offspring of our teeming brains, with what different feelings would we send it forth ! 

When you shall have read through our darling book from preface to finis in the 
quiet retirement of your own snuggery, what disposition toward the class of '94, we 
wonder, will it have engendered in your aforetime peaceful breast. Will you meet us 
as the traditional wife always meets the traditional husband, " with a sweet smile and 
words of welcome," or like the spoiled beauty of the story book, " with proud look and 

averted eye will you coldly pass us by ? " 

(21) 



Let us in advance suggest the former rather than the latter demonstration. This, 
if we know you as we think we do, will doubtless be the case ; or if there be a quarrel, 
may it be only a lover's quarrel for the bliss of " making up." 

It has been the aim of the editors to make this volume of the Allerlei interesting 
to the public, creditable to ourselves, and to Lasell. How well we have succeeded we 
leave you to judge. We solicit criticism on any point in which your judgment tells you 
we have failed. It will be kindly received, jotted clown, and handed over to the class 
of '95, so that by timely warning they may avoid the pitfalls into which we have stumbled ; 
for, of course, they will expect to produce the " finest Allerlei " ever published. . 

We bequeath to them the wise words: Noble Endeavor, Self-sacrifice, Aspiration, 
Concentration, E Pluribus Unum, Excelsior ! 

(22) 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



REY. WM. R. CLARK, D.D. 

REY. C. PARKHURST, D.D. 

PROF. JULES LUQUIEKTS. 
C. C. BRAGDON. 

MRS. C. C. BRAGDOR. 



FACULTY. 



CHARLES C. BRAGDON, M.A., 

Principal. 
Constitution of United States and Political Economy. 

CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 

Assistant Principal. 
Efiglish Literature and History. 

HARRIETTE J. ECKFORD, 
Preceptress. 
Manners and Dress. 

GEORGE M. STEELE, D.D., 
Pastor. 
Bible, Ethics, Psychology. 

WILLL\M J. ROLFE, M.A., 
Shakespeare. 

ANNA R. LATIMER, 
English. 

LILLIE M. PACKARD, Ph.B., 
Mathematics. 



HERBERT LOWELL RICH, Ph.B., 

Natural Sciences. 



ADELE ROTH, 
German. 



JEANNE LeROYER, 
FreiicJi. 



LILY J. ECKFORD, 

Latin and Greek. 



ISABEL SHINN, 
Reading. 



MARTHA E. RANSOM, 
Physical Culture. 



ELIZABETH C. McMARTIN, 

Assistant in Gymnastics. 



ANNIE P. CALL, 
Nerve Training. 



MAJOR GEORGE H. BENYON, 

Military Drill. 



(24) 



JOSEPH A. HILLS, 
Fianoforte. 

J. WALTER DAVIS, 

I'oke Ctiltiirc and Chorus Singing. 



KATE M. PLUMMER, 

Organ . 



WILLIS E. NOWELL, 

Violin . 



LOUISE PUTNAM, 

Gttitar and Mandolin. 



HENRY ORNE RYDER, 



Drawing atid Painfing. 



MARY P. WITHERBEE, 

History of Art. Spelling. 



ANNA M. NICHOLLS, 

Cookifig. Practice Classes. 

ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL, 

Book-keeping and Penmanship. 

WILLIAM D. BRIDGE, 
Phonography. 

EMILY H. GENN, 
Typewriting. 

SUSAN TRUE, 

Dress-citttiiig. 

MADAME M. DAVIS, 

Millinery. 

MARY L. NUTT, 

Nurse. 



ELLEN T. LONGFELLOW, 

History of Art. 



ANNA BARROWS, 
Cooking. Demonstrations . 



ANNIE B. WINSLOW, 
Swimmiw''. 



MARY P. WITHERBEE, 

Librarian. 



(^5) 



CLASSES 



''Jii^y firstli9(55 of a season pot yet due." 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Mono : " Deeds, not words." 



Class Colors : Heliotrope and white. 



Class Flower : Heliotrope. 



Louise P. Hubbard 



President. 



Names. 

Isabel E. Bronson . 
Josephine B. Chandler 
Ellen A. Chase 
Mamie Cruikshank . 
Jane E. Fitch . 
Harriette P. Fitch . 
Mary P. Hanson 
Lestra M. Hibberd . 
Louise P. Hubbard 
Alice M. Lyman 
Elizabeth McEchron 
Florence A. Ray 
Cara A. Sawin 
Beulah Shannon 
Meldon Smith 
Grace Snyder . 
Mary R. Wiggin 



Residences. 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Maiden, Mass. , 
Walnut Hill, Mass. 
Hannibal, Mo. 
Mooers, N.Y. . 
Mooers, N.Y. . 
Chicago, 111. 
Richmond, Ind. 
WheeUng, W. Va. 
Rochester, N.Y. 
Glens Falls, N.Y. 
Ottawa, Ont. . 
Troy, N.Y. 
Medford, Mass. 
Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Washington, D.C. 
Maiden, Mass. . 

(29) 



Rooms. 

8 
70 

i2, 

54 
54 
53 

39 

27 

14 
29 

51 
8 

Annex I 
14 
52 



FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY. 



FROM time immemorial, Freshmen have been considered the freshest of the fresh, and the 
greenest of the green. They have been hazed, fagged, required to perform imcongenial 
offices — receiving in return unmerited scorn and contempt. This spirit has sometimes 
prevailed in women's colleges to a certain extent, but it does not exist at Lasell. Here 
true merit is recognized by the upper classes. Since it requires some talent to discern and appreciate 
genius, they thereby show superior ability in their approbation of the Freshman class. Although 
" we say it as shouldn't say it," it is an unusual class. Such fertility of resources ! Such power of 
acquisition ! Such wealth of invention ! Without one exception, they all possess striking talents. Here 
is found a second Patti, a veritable Titian, a Paderewski, and a Camilla Urso ! There are many 
others just as worthy of mention, but we know that before long they will gain proper recognition, 
and that upon mention of their names it will be said with pride and pleasure, " Oh, yes, I remember 
— members of that unusual class of '96 at Lasell ! " 

Of course we have had now and then a rugged path in the joyous year just closing. For 
example, one of our number, who is a fine horsewoman, went riding one fine day with two " grave 
and reverend Seniors ; " whether it was the exhilaration of the hour, the inflation of pride, or 
the limitation or congestion of the street, she certainly did smash into a carriage whose wheel then 
and there came off. The irate lady of the aforesaid carriage did then, after some excitement, 
capture the fair equestrienne, who bravely footed the bill, and returned to Lasell a sadder, yet a 
wiser, maiden. 

(30) 



Have we ever been sent to Stvidy Hall? Have 7ue ever been sent from chapel? Not we, 
indeed. Not long since a most delightful reception was given by the Freshmen and Sophomores. 
It was remarked by disinterested observers that it was the finest affair of the kind ever known here. 
Modesty forbids us to tell to whom its success was due, but we may remark in passing that the 
Sophomores were here last year, but where were wc ? When we hear it said everywhere that we are 
a wonderful class, we may be pardoned a little self-gratulation, but we try to repress everything like 
vanity and self-consciousness. Yet we cannot but be aware that we have laid a firm structure for 
building characters worthy of Lasell. 

Our class flower is the modest, sweet, attractive heliotrope. One always recognizes its prox- 
imity ; though unseen it is pervasive. Heliotrope thus symbolizes our influence as a class. All through 
the ages, this flower has had a tender significance. It fulfils the greatest of all commands, which is 
— Amo Te. 



(30 



'J^eyday, vuf^at a su/(^(^p of uar^ity Gom(^5 tf7i5 u;ay ! " 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Motto : " Palma non sine labore est.'' 



Class Colors : Black and orange. Class Flower : Ox-eye daisy, 



Caroline Ladd Steel 



President. 



Names. 

Grace L. Allen 
Alice Andreesen 
Sara A. Bond 
K. Belle Bragdon . 
Georgie B. Davis . 
Bertha A. Lillibridge 
Edith E. Libby 
Marie McDonald . 
Madeline M. Meegan 
Julia Murphy 
Mabel C. Taylor . 
Minnie Warner 
Louise C. Whitney 



Residences. 

Omaha, Neb. . 
Omaha, Neb. . 
Cliftondale, Mass. 
Auburndale, Mass. . 
Chicago, 111. . 
Minneapolis, Minn. . 
Portland, Maine 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Portsmouth, Ohio 
Omaha, Neb. . 
Willimantic, Conn. . 
Bay City, Mich. 



Rooms. 

44 

65 
6 

30 
22 

45 

25 

19 
Annex I 

9 
20 

40 



(35) 



SOPHOMORE HISTORY. 



GHE Annual of '93 would indeed be deficient, if the Sophomores did not relate their 
wondrous deeds. Those around us may think that we are just an ordinary class ; 
but appearances are deceiving, for any one visiting our recitation-room would 
be readily convinced that " Still waters run deep." 

Now that v^e have passed through the portal of the Freshman year, we are at that 
stage of knowledge where the reminiscences of the past aid us in our daily work. We often 
imagine the privileges and joys of the Junior and Senior years, and console ourselves by 
thinking that our time is not far off. 

Our ability is displayed in various ways. Of course we have no intention of boasting, 
but one would be astonished to hear with what freedom our Sophomores use the elegant 
Parisian accent when conversing with their native French teacher; and then the ease with 
which German verse is memorized and repeated shows our devotion to modern languages, 
and our genius in a linguistic way. This aptitude we evince is due to a great extent to our 
natural taste for music, as a musical ear is of untold value in conquering the difficulties of 
pronunciation. 

We can well afford to be proud of our elocutionists and musicians, who, now on the 
path of progress, will without a doubt become famous, and be the prima donnas of the 
coming century. 

We are not lacking in science, for have not some of our members produced wonder- 
ful effects in the physical laboratory? 

C36) 



However, our talent is especially noticeable in trigonometry, as some seldom have to 
prepare the lesson, but depend on inspiration when called upon to recite ; nevertheless, this 
year will finish our course in mathematics, and our amount of knowledge in that branch 
will be found in the unknown quantity. 

And so we could go on enumerating the different accomplishments of our class, but 
we do not wish to appear egotistical, therefore will forbear. 

We are ever on the alert for a jolly time, always seeing the ludicrous in everything, 
often to the annoyance of our teachers, who sometimes fail to see the point. 

Our ages vary from sweet sixteen to sedate twenty; our heights from five feet to five 
feet six inches; our weights from ninety to one hundred and forty. But comparisons grow 
monotonous, hence no statement of our mental capacity will be here mentioned. 

Our way has often been paved with trials and temptations, and the dark shadow of 
discouragement has frequently blinded our future ; but in the distance a bright star of hope 
beams forth, and we begin again with renewed vigor. 

The mount of success is not easily climbed, but each day finds us one step nearer the 
top. Our sentiments are best expressed by the poet's words : 

Heaven is not reached at a single bound, 
But we build the ladder by which we rise 
From the lowly earth to the vaulted skies. 
And we mount to its summit round by round. 

(37) 



" <5al/T\, serious, fit to stapd t\)(^ i^aze of /T)illio95." 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Motto : Non nobis solum sed omnibtis. 



Class Color : White and gold. 



Class Flower : Daisy. 



HONORARY MEMBER. 



/V?!- 









Helen Boullt Medsker 
JuLLA W. Anderson 
Rebecca C. Shepherd 



(41) 



President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



JUNIOR CLASS MEMBERS. 



Names. 

Julia W. Anderson . 
L. Mabel Case 
Carolyn E. Crilman . 
Annie R. Hanna 
Julia E. Hogg 
Carrie B. Johnson . 
Carrie T. Manning . 
Helen B. Medsker . 
Alice Noble . 
Lotta J. Proctor 
Jennie M. Rich 
Grace Robb . 
Harriett G. Scott 
Rebecca C. Shepherd 
Gertrude Sherman . 
Greta Stearns . 
MoUie St. John Taylor 
May Tulleys . 
Mildred C. Warren . 
Nora Westheimer 
Virginia Wyckoff 



Residences. 

Taylorsville, 111. 
South Manchester, Conn 
Marshalltown, la. 
Jackson, Mich. 
Fort Worth, Texas 
Brewster, N.Y. 
Orange, Mass. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Tiffin, Ohio 
Waterville, Maine 
Bethel, Maine 
Toledo, Ohio 
Wyoming, 111. 
Auburndale, Mass, 
Wollaston Heights, Mass. 
Wyoming, Ohio 
Toledo, Ohio 
Councir Bluffs, la. 
New Boston, N.H. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
Hightstown, N.J. 



Rooms. 
65 

4 

66 

Annex II 

22 

39 
Annex I 

25 

60 

Annex II 

Annex II 

63 
28 



Annex I 

4 
62 

63 
Annex II 

6 



(42) 



JUNIOR HISTORY. 




NE autumn day, with tears and much distress, 
Five little maids here made their weary way : 
Millie and Helen, Carrie, Julia, and Bess 
Came to Lasell on that past autumn day, 
To be reformed in learning and in dress, 
And to explore what joys in knowledge lay. 

So one by one we gathered here to share 
The joys and sorrows of dear " Ninety-four ; " 
Learned 'neath the faculty's protecting care 
The things we never knew in days of yore ; 
Of how we in the Gym should do and dare ; 
Of science and of history's weary lore. 

Oh, never were their eyes bedimmed with tears, 
Our brilliant class, endued with knowledge all ; 
For they were ne'er oppressed with dreadful fears 
That such calamity would them befall. 
Nor ignominy touch their tender years. 
By ever being sent to Study Hall. 

For when they beard the lion in his den, 
As oft they must on wisdom's weary road, 
To tell what they of chemistry do ken. 
One maiden bright explained the very mode 
Of how a mouse shut up in oxygen, 
If left there long, would certainly explode. 

(43) 



In future years we will be for our nation, 

If our present brilliancy is any sign, 

The brightest star in science constellation 

Which o'er the world will ever brightly shine, 

Studied by the future generation, 

Shedding radiance over subjects deep and fine. 

And thus in mademoiselle's class ^ — so 'tis said — 
They in the French Club wished to have a play. 
"Where are the Gentlemen?" the title read. 
But after while the teacher grave did say, 
"The ladies too? The ladies! Where are they?" 
Alas ! Alas ! The ladies too had fled ! 

No more of our achievements will we tell ; 
'Twould volumes fill should we relate them all. 
Enough to say, /;/ all things we excel ; 
So let our deeds and conquests, great and small. 
Bear witness for themselves at old Lasell, 
And let them us to future greatness call. 

But now the year is drawing to an end ; 

Wisdom's ladder we've ascended round by round : 

But one step more remains yet to ascend 

Ere our efforts with great triumph shall be crowned. 

And the sorrows which our Freshman hearts did rend 

'Mongst next year's Seniors will no more be found. 



(44) 



" f\ /narqf^ of i9telle(;t (?) " 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Motto : Not finished, but begun. 



Class Color : Blood-red and Gold. 



Class Flower : Jacqueminot Rose. 



HONORARY MEMBER 
Caroline A. Carpenter. 



Flora M. Gardner 
Nelle G. Davis 
Ida O. Short . 



Names. 

Jennie M. Arnold 
Eva L. Couch 
Nelle G. Davis 
Clara L. Eads 
Elizabeth Ewing 
Flora M. Gardner 
Jessie M. Gaskill 
Harriet Noble 
Bessie M. Pennell 
Nellie M. Richards 
Esther Scouller 
Ida O. Short . 
Efifie E. Symns 



Residences. 

Peabody, Mass. 
Round Pond, Me. 
Chicago, 111. 
Paris, 111. 
Atchison, Kan. 
Chicago, 111. 
Woonsocket, R.I. 
Tiffin, Ohio 
Atchison, Kan. 
Newton Centre, Mass 
North East, Penn. 
North East, Penn. 
Atchison, Kan. 

(47) 



President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



Rooms. 
38 

30 
26 
24 

31 

5 
60 

43 

27 

7 

7 
24 



SENIOR HISTORY. 



^HE history of the Senior class must be written. We must write a history, although most of it is, as 
[^fe) our motto indicates, not finished, but begun. It is recorded only on the pages of the future, and 

will be given to the world only when Lachesis, the controlling fate of our destinies, as she draws 
out the many-hued thread of our lives, shall reveal the mighty honors she holds in store for the class of 
ninety- three. Lasell shall then be proud of us, and she will exclaim, with all the triumph that only her 
sex is capable of, " I told you so ! I always knew that class would distinguish itself." For of course 
we all intend to become famous. 

First, we mention Betty, — When that wild and woolly State from whence she came has ex- 
tended still more its recognition of the rights and privileges of our sex, then Betty will be our sole rep- 
resentative in Congress, and will carry through that august assemblage a law, firm as that of the Medes 
and the Persians, to the effect that all instructors in Black Art of Chemistry shall be put to a most 
ignominious death. Thus will she avenge her suffering sisters who, in an evil hour, chose science as 
one of their electives. 

Nell, too, will devote herself to the well-being of her kind, and, following in the footsteps of 
Madame Jeness Miller, she will advocate the dress reform, sans corsets, sans demis ; and we shall once 
again be reminded of Lasell, where she received her first inspiration for this noble work. 

Flo would win her way to fame by means of the brush and palette, and upon her will rest the 
honor of redeeming our sex from the artistic oblivion into which we have fallen. Eva, an earnest 
disciple of /Esculapius, will strive to send her share of souls as passengers to Charon, the burly boatman 
of the Styx. For this distinguished pillster we feel that we are much indebted to the wise precepts of 
Dr. Latham, and to those daily instilled by Miss Nutt. Clara, our second youngest, we hope will 
increase in grace and wisdom as she grows in stature, and she will shine as the wife of some famous 
follower of Blackstone, who will wear the sombre robes of a Supreme Judge. 

Then there is Besse, our youngest, our pride and joy. Besse, our baby Besse, who even now, in 
her infancy, has devoted her tender years to the Muses. When at last she arrives at years of discre- 
tion, she shall shine forth as the poetess of the nineteenth century, on whose brow we shall place 
America's laurel crown of honor. 

And thus it will be with all our number. Each shall be the bright particular star of her own 
constellation. But these things the grim future is waiting to proclaim. My province is to tell you con- 
cerning our history of the past five years, during which we have mounted step by step, until we arrived 
at the unattainable heights of bliss where we now stand, and survey the less fortunate world as it 
struggles madly for the place which shall soon know us no more. 

(48) 



To begin with we came, later we saw and conquered ; but first, O unhappy Preparatories ! Hke 
you, we came. With great, envious eyes we beheld the staid and dignified first row, and thought how 
much they must know. You in your innocence are not deceived, my little sisters. We do know much. 
Our knowledge is unfathomable. Once we studied the same amo, amas, amat, that now perplexes 
your weary brains ; but now, ah, now ! we delight in the odes of Horace. We roam at will over icy 
glaciers in geology. Our remarks are all strictly logical, and, like the wise men of old, we study the 
heavens and are learned in celestial affairs. And do we not triumph in less sesthetic things? 

Can we not cai-ve even the most ancient and obdurate of turkeys in such a manner as to cause 
even Mr. Rich himself to turn green with envy ? And one of us, for this graceful art of cai-ving, received 
the olive crown with which the ancients used to crown their victorious athletes. Then did not two 
more of our number proudly bear away the prizes for the two best loaves of bread? 

As possessors of such trophies, who can doubt the grace and dignity with which we shall preside 
in our future homes? If you require more proof, behold the programme of the Glee Club, mute symbol 
of our last victory over the faculty ; and if, still unconvinced, you demand yet another, we bring forth 
our crowning work, our Allerlei. There may be others in the future as good, but we doubt it. Now, it 
stands alone, the flower of Lasell literature. At last you must stand silent. You no longer dare to 
doubt. 

All this have we accomplished, and yet have we never lost the beautiful simplicity of manners 
that distinguished our Freshman days. This, together with our extremely youthful appearance, led one 
of the new teachers to mistake us for the Preparatories, until we astonished her by the brilliancy of our 
intellects. 

Part of our success is no doubt due to our guardian angel, who hovers above us with protecting 
wings. But mtich is to be attributed to our own natural ability. Lasell, our dear old Alma Mater, has 
done much for us, but Nature has done more ; and while we would render honor where honor is due, 
we cannot help but feel that such a class, like a poet, is born, not made. 

Now that we are so soon to leave you, a tender feeling fills our hearts, even toward our greatest 
foe, the faculty, and we sadly say farewell. We know that in life's great school-room our lessons are 
indeed "not finished, but begun." Our little class will never more gather for recitations, except in that 
vast school-room, after once we have left these portals. Nevertheless, we would not say good-by, but, 
with the Germans, " Auf Wiedersehen," the sweet old word of hope ; for 

"Only for a season our partings are; 
Nor shall we wait in vain 
Until we meet again." 

(49) 



IRREGULARS, 



Names. 

Ethel N. Anderson . 
Lottie F. Appel 
Mabelle A. Barnard 
Elizabeth C. Bennett 
Helen W. Boss 
Eugenie E. Burbank 
Mae A. Burr . 
Bertha E. Butterfield 
Stella B. Cady 
Helen M. Camp 
Frances L. Casebolt 
Mary L. Chapin 
Anna C. Christie 
Helen W. Cleaveland 
Grace Clifford 
Laura R. Comstock 
Bessie L. Comstock 
Winifred T. Conlin 
Helen W. Cooke 
Anna E. Crocker 
Mabel L. Crocker 
Annie F. Cushing 
Maud Day 
Bertha De Bruler 
Florence E. Dow 
Grace E. Dvvinal 



Residences. 

Orange, N.J. 
Denver, Col. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Albany, N.Y. . 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Whilinsville, Mass. 
Lincoln, Neb. . 
Waterville, Me. 
North Adams, Mass. 
West Winsted, Conn 
Belleville, N.J. . 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Marash, Turkey 
Denver, Col. . 
New York, N.Y. 
Ivory ton. Conn. 
Ivoryton, Conn. 
New York, N.Y. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Foxcroft, Me. . 
Akron, Ohio 
Evansville, Ind. 
Chicago, 111. 
Mechanic's Falls, Me 

(50) 



Rooms. 
• 38 

47 
9 

35 
Annex II 

17 

23 



44 

64 

64 

10 

Annex II 

• 36 

48 

Annex II 

41 

• 

Annex II 
Annex II 



IRREGULARS.— Continued. 



Names. 

Daisy G. Earle 
Fanny V. Fairchild . 
Marion B. Fessenden 
Elizabeth W. Fleming 
Blanche Fowler 
Hattie L. Freebey 
Josephine Furniss 
Myra N. Gage • 
Edith S- Hall . 
Dasie A. Hartson 
Sara E. Hayden 
Mary M. Healey 
Helen A. Holden 
Frances D. Holmes 
Florence M. Holmes 
Grace S. Holmes 
Olive Holmes 
Abby S. Hooper 
Beulah Hough 
Alice J. Houghton 
Blanche C. Howard 
June M. Hoyt 
Minnie I. Hyde 
Flora V. Joannes 
Bessie D. Johnson 
Grace A. Johnson 
Anna P. Kellogg 
Ura L. Kelley 
Minnie P. Kiesel 
Sallie C. King 
Ursula King . 
Mary D. Lathrop 



Residences. 

Newton, Mass. . 
Marinette, Wis. 
Townsend, Mass. 
Shelbyville, Ind. 
Chicago, 111. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
Chelsea, Mass. . 
Napa, Cal. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Albany, N.Y. . 
Norristown, Pa. 
Nashua, N.H. 
Willimantic, Conn. 
Oscoda, Mich. . 
Keen's Mills, Me. . 
Jackson, Mich. 
North Adams, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Olympia, Wash. 
Newtonville, Mass. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Pittsburg, Penn. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Omaha, Neb. . 
Ogden, Utah . 
Chicago, 111. 
Little Falls, N.Y. 
Stafford Springs, Conn. 

(SO 



Rooms. 

52 
20 
70 

13 

Annex I 

70 

Annex II 

Annex II 

Annex II 

I 

47 

58 
Annex II 

48 
Annex II 

18 

17 

55 
10 

Annex II 
Annex I 

5 
45 

Annex II 

Annex II 
67 



IRREGULARS. — Contimied. 



Names. 

Bessie S. Latimer . 
Margaret H. Laughlin 
Harriet Lewis 
Grace E. Loud 
Mabel M. Lutes 
Anna S. McDuffee 
Marie R. Meigs 
Bertha Merryman 
Mary M. Miller 
Anna W. Miller 
Mabel A. Morgan 
Helen B. Morris 
Isabella Morrow 
Edith D. Partridge 
Ella G. Peale . 
Emma W. Peale 
Emma E. Porter 
Mary M. Ranney 
Ava F. Rawleigh 
Ednah F. Ray 
Lucy T. Richmond 
Clara A. Roesing 
Bessie T. Roper 
Ruth V. Sankey 
L. Mabel Sawyer 
Mary Seaman . 
Ruth Seiberling 
Clara B. Simpson 
Laura F. Smith 
Meldon Smith 
Helen J. Steel 
Elizabeth Stephenson 



Residences. 

Auburndale, Mass. 
Evansville, Ind. 
Urbana, Ohio 
Everett, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Bradford, Vt. 
Painesville, Ohio 
Marinette, Wis. 
Bay City, Mich. 
Plainfield, N.J. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Locust Valley, L.I 
Boston, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Newton Centre 
Adams, N.Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
Peabody, Mass. 
Hoosick Falls, N.Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
Hopedale, Mass. 
Salem, Mo. . 
Auburndale, Mass 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Akron, Ohio 
Scran ton. Pa. 
Troy, N.Y. . 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Portland, Oregon 
Marinette, Wis. 

(52) 



Rooms. 



32 

37 

13 
Annex II 

II 

Annex II 
40 

49 
1 1 

62 

Annex I 

76 

76 

57 
31 
23 
49 
56 
Annex II 
Annex II 

^(^ 
41 
19 

Annex I 

50 
29 



IRREGULARS.— Concluded. 



Names. 

Margaret Stewart 
Martha B. Stone 
Grace Sutherland 
Mabel Tomlinson 
Louise G. Tucker 
LiUie S. Tukey 
Helen T. Turner 
Mary L. Van Patten 
Emma E. Walker 
Anna Walston 
Eliza H. Warren 
Jamie L. Watson 
Annie L. Webb 
Josie H. West 
Emma L. White 
Bertha M. Wilson 
Elizabeth Winslow 
Louise Zschetzsche 



Residences. 

Columbus, Ohio 
Omaha, Neb. 
Ashland, Wis. 
Fort Worth, Tex. 
Waterville, Me. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Auburndale, Mass 
Burhngton, Vt. 
Willimantic, Conn 
Decatur, 111. 
Fall River, R.I. 
Columbus, Ohio 
Jackson, Mich. 
Provincetown, Mass 
Wethersfield, Conn. 
Norwalk, Conn. 
Jamestown, N.D. . 
Sheboygan, Wis. . 



Rooms. 

Annex I 
26 

37 

^5 
Annex II 

35 
28 

58 

Annex I 
18 

43 
74 
56 
51 
53 



^53) 



IFn nDemodam^ 



LIZZIE SHINN, 

Died October 13, i8q2. 



ESTELLA S. GOULD, 

Died October 21, i8q2. 



GERTRUDE LITTLEFIELD, 

Died yanttary q, iSqs. 



MARGARET DALEY BRODRICK, 

Died February i, iSqs- 



(54) 




DT^-k/^./'liil/f 



S. D. SOCIETY 



President. 
HELEN B, MEDSKER. 

Vice- Pre side II t. 
LOUISE P. HUBBARD. 

Secretary. Treasurer. 

HELEN W. COOKE. ELIZABETH STEPHENSON. 

Ushers. 
STELLA B. CADY, ALICE J- HOUGHTON. 

Critic. 
ANNA WATSON. 



JULIA W. ANDERSON, 



Executive Committee. 



MABEL CASE, 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



CLARA L. EADS. 



Martha E. Ransom, 

Florence Wells, 

(55) 



J. Walter Davis, 

Isabel Shinn. 



MEMBERS OF S. D. SOCIETY. 



Grace L. Allen, 

Julia W. Anderson, 
Alice Andreesen, 

Lottie F. Appel, 

Elizabeth C. Bennett, 
Sara A. Bond, 

Helen W. Boss, 
K. Belle Bragdon, 
Mae A. Burr, 

Mabel Case, 

Helen W. Cooke, 

Helen W. Cleaveland, 
Anna E. Crocker, 

Mabel L. Crocker, 
Mamie Cruikshank, 

Frances L. Casebolt, 
Clara L. Eads, 

Elizabeth Ewing, 

Fanny V. Fairchilds, 

Carolyn E. Oilman, 
Frances Holmes, 
Julia E. Hogg, 

Daisy A. Hartson, 
Mae M. Healy, 

Louise P. Hubbard, 

Lestra M. Hibbard, 
Alice J. Houghton, 

Helen A. Holden, 

Carrie B. Johnson, 

Jessie J. Johnson, 

Bessie D. Johnson, 



Mabel M. Lutes, 

Bertha A. Lillibridge, 
Harriet Lewis, 

Helen B. Medsker, 

Marie McDonald, 

Elizabeth McEchron, 
Isabella Morrow, 
Madehne M. Meegan, 
Lillie M. Packard, 

Bessie M. Pennell, 
Florence A. Ray, 

Clara A. Roesing, 

Bessie Shepherd, 
Mary Seaman, 
Helen J. Steel, 

Carrie L. Steel, 

Martha B. Stone, 

Effie E. Symms, 
Grace Snyder, 

Elizabeth Stephenson, 
Beulah H. Shannon, 
Margaret Stewart, 
Lillie S. Tukey, 

Mabel C. Taylor, 

Mary L. Van Patten, 
Virginia Wyckoff, 
Jamie L. Watson, 

Maisy R. Wiggin, 

Elizabeth Winslow, 

Anna Walston, 

Louise Zschetzche. 



(56) 




llri'h-ti.l'hiUt . 



LASELLIA CLUB. 



President. 
LOUISE C. WHITNEY. 



Vice-President. 
JUNE M. HOYT. 



Secretary. 
RUTH SEIBERLING. 



BERTHA M. WILSON, 



Treasurer. 
GRACE S. HOLMES. 

Guard. 
. EMMA M. PEALE. 

Executive Committee. 
WINIFRED T. CONLIN, 

MEMBERS OF LASELLIA CLUB. 



Critic. 
MOLLIE S. TAYLOR. 



MOLLIE D. LATHROP. 



Jennie M. Arnold. 
Mabel A. Barnard. 
Nellie A. Chase. 

Josephine B. Chandler. 
Winifred T. Conlin. 
Annie F. Cushing. 
Nelle G. Davis. 

Georgie Bell Davis. 
Grace E. Dwinal. 
Maud Day. 

Elizabeth W. Fleming. 

Blanche Fowler. 
Flora M. Gardner. 

Mary P. Hanson. 



Sara Hayden. 

Grace S. Holmes. 
Olive Holmes. 
June M. Hoyt. 
Minnie P. Keisel. 
Anna P. Kellogg.' 
MoLLiE D. Lathrop. 
Grace E. Loud. 

Carrie T. Manning. 
Mary M. Miller. 
Edith D. Partridge. 

Ella G. Peale. 
Emma W. Peale. 

Mary M. Ranney. 



AvA F. Rawleigh. 
Nellie M. Richards. 
Grace M. Robb. 
Cara a. Sawin. 
Esther Scouller. 
Ruth Seiberling. 
Ida O. Short. 
Clara Simpson. 
Greta Stearns. 
Mollie S. Taylor. 
Mary Tulleys. 

Louise C. Whitney. 
Bertha M. Wilson. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Herbert L. Rich. 



Elizabeth C. McMartin. 



(57) 



INSTRUMENTAL CLUB. 



Ethel N. Anderson. 
Lottie F. Appel. 
Jennie M. Arnold. 
Mary E. Aston. 

Mabelle a. Banard. 
Sara A. Bond. 

K. Belle Bragdon. 
Louise Bull. 
Mae a. Burr. 
Stella B. Cady. 
L. Mabel Case. 
Josephine B. Chandler. 
Laura R. Comstock. 
Winifred T. Conlin. 
Anna E. Crocker. 
Mamie Cruikshank. 
Annie F. Cushing. 
Georgie B. Davis. 
Bertha DeBruler. 
Marion Fessenden. 
Carolyn E. Oilman. 
Sara Hayden. 

Mary M. Healey. 



Lestra M. Hibberd. 
Julia E. Hogg. 
Grace Holmes. 
Olive Holmes. 

Alice J. Houghton. 
Blanche Howard. 
Flora Joannes. 
Grace A. Johnson. 
Jessie J. Johnson. 
Ura L. Kelly. 
Sallie King. 
Ursula King. 

Margaret Laughlin. 
Bertha A. Lillibridge. 
Jennie LeRoyer. 
Carrie Manning. 
Elizabeth McEchron. 
Elizabeth McMartin. 
Madeline M. Meegan. 
Marie Meigs. 

Bertha Merryman. 
Mary Miller. 
Isabella Morrow. 
(59) 



Ella G. Peale. 
LOTTA J. Proct'or. 
Ednah F. Ray. 
Florence A. Ray. 
Nellie M. Richards. 
Grace Robb. 

Clara A. Roesing. 
Ruth V. Sankey. 

Beulah H. Shannon. 
Bess C. Shepherd. 
Meldon Smith. 
Grace Skinner. 
Grace Snyder. 

Margaret Stewart. 
Effie E. Symns. 
Mabel C. Taylor. 
Mary L. Van Paiten. 
EsTELLE Walker. 
Anna Walston. 

Mildred C. Warren. 
Maisy R. Wiggin. 
Nora Westheimer. 
Louise Zschetzsche. 




DRESS-CUTTING. 



Mabelle a. Barnard, 

Elizabeth C. Bennett, 
Anna E. Crocker, 

Carolyn E. Oilman, 

Frances D. Holmes, 



Isabella Morrow, 

Clara A. Roesing, 

Ruth V. Sankey, 

Helen J. Steel, 

LiLLIE S. TUKEY, 



Grace G. Holmes, 

Bessie S. Latimer, 
(60) 



Elizabeth Winslow. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



Nellie M. Richards . 
Bertha A. Lillieridge 
Julia E. Hogg 
Mrs. W. T. Shepherd . 
LiLLiE M. Packard 
Grace E. Loud 
May Tulleys 



President. 
Vice-Presiden t 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 

Executive Committee. 



SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR. 



Mildred C. Warren . 
Fannie V. Fairchild . 
Bertha A. Lillieridge 
Hattie L. Freebey 
Elizabeth W. Fleming 
Bessie D. Johnson 
Annie F. Cushing 
Grace Sutherland 
Jennie M. Arnold 
Emma L. White . 
Marion B. Fessenden 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Treasurer. 

Lookout Committee. 

Music. 

Prayer Meetings. 

Temperance. 



(61) 



SWIMMERS. 



Alice Andreesen, 
Jennie M. Arnold, 
Mary Aston, 

Elizabeth Bennett, 
Helen W. Boss, 
Mae A. Burr, 
Stella B. Cady, 
L. Mabel Case, 

Frances L. Casebolt, 
Ellen A. Chase, 
Winifred T. Conlin, 
Eva L. Couch, 
Nelle G. Davis, 
Florence E. Dow, 

Elizabeth W. Fleming, 
Blanche Fowler, 
Jessie M. Gaskill, 
Carolyn E. Oilman, 
Mary Hanson, 

Lestra M. Hibberd, 



Julia E. Hogg, 
Helen A. Holden, 
Frances D. Holmes, 
Blanche Howard, 
Louise P. Hubbard, 
Sally H. Jacobus, 
Carrie B. Johnson, 
Bessie D. Johnson, 
Anna P. Kellogg, 
Minnie P. Kiesel, 
Bertha A. LiUibridge, 
Elizabeth McEchron, 
Helen B. Medsker, 
Marie R. Meigs, 
Anna W. Miller, 
Alice Noble, 
Hattie Noble, 
Ella G. Peale, 
Emma M. Peale, 

(62) 



Lotta J. Proctor, 
Mary M. Ranney. 
yVva F. Rawleigh, 
Ednah F. Ray, 
Clara A. Roesing, 
Harriette G. Scott, 
Ruth Seiberhng, 
Gertrude Sherman, 
Ida J. Short, 
Grace Snyder, 
Greta Stearns, 
Helen J. Steel, 
Carrie L. Steel, 
Margaret Stewart, 
Anna Walston, 
Minnie Warner, 
Nora Westheimer, 
EHzabeth Winslow, 
Louise Zschetzsche. 



LASELL BATTALION 



Helen B. Medsker 
Sybil H. Spaulding 
Bertha A. Lillibridge 



OFFICERS. 



Acting Major. 
Acting Adjutant. 



COMPANY A. 



Captain, Helen B. Medsker. 

Sergeants. 
Lillie S. Tukey, 
Florence A. Ray, 
Mary M. Miller, 
Marie McDonald. 



Captain, K. Belle Bragdon. 

Sergeants. 
Alice Andreesen, 
Julia E. Hogg, 
Grace L. Allen. 



Captain, Carolyn E. Oilman. 

Sergeants. 
Louise C. Whitney, 
MoLLiE S. Taylor, 
Carrie L. Steel, 
Bertha A. Lillibridge 



Lieutenant, Julia W. Anderson. 

Corporals. 
Blanche C. Howard, 
Mary P. Hanson, 
Jennie M. Rich. 

COMPANY B. 

Lieutenant, Lottie F. Appel. 

Corporals. 
LoiTA J. Proctor, 
Elizabeth \V. Fleming, 
Mabel Tomlinson. 

COMPANY C. 

Lieutenant, Sibyl H. Spaulding. 

Corporals. 
Anna E. Crocker, 
Anna Walston, 
Effie E. Symns. 



(63) 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 



'T^HE achievements of this department have called forth boundless praise from all beholders. 

The dignified, soldier-like bearing of the young women, their strict attention to duty, and, 
above all, their instant obedience to orders, arouse the greatest admiration, and immediately bring 
to one's mind the thought, " What caif t a woman do? " 

Hear the order, " Right forward, fours right ! " ring out clear as a bell, as the dignified young 
captain takes her company in hand. Out wheel the fours, some threes with number four straggling 
behind in an imaginary line of her own. And why is the left four so far behind ! Oh, yes ! One soldier 
must stop to arrange her hair. 

This one's cap is not set becomingly, so as soon as she reaches the mirror the ranks march on 
without her until it is adjusted to her satisfaction and a coquettish curl pulled into place. But she soon 
dodges into her position, and the column sweeps grandly on. 

"To the rear, march ! " Now what a scramble ! All is wild confusion for a moment, but soon 
is heard again the steady tramp, tramp. Not a vestige of disorder can now be seen — all is once more 
placid as a summer sea. In rapid succession come the commands, "Right by twos ! " " Fours right 
about ! " " Left front into line ! " " Forward, guide right, march ! " All so admirably executed that 
we confidently exclaim, " Our republic is safe indeed ! Even her maidens are trained for war !" 

He of the far-famed cherry-tree, our father George, once said, " To be prepared for war is one 
of the most effectual means of preserving peace." We live in this glad age of peace and know its 
blessings ; hence we have taken the good man's advice, and are ready to march to the front at the first 
sounding of the drum, and to fight and die for our country. 

(65) 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



".Young women of Lasell, you are sowing to-day the seed which your children and your children's 
children will reap! What will the harvest be?" — Latham. 



THE day of the leech and the medicine-man is past and gone. The time was when all 
a physician needed was a steady hand to apply the lancet, and a practised eye to 
distinguish the mint, the sassafras, and the tansy from the profusion of plants in wood 
and field. 

Now, not only a certificate of graduation from a reputable medical college is 
required, but by some States a State examination must be passed before the ambitious man is 
permitted to go forth to fulfil his destiny. The more intelligent the people become, the 
greater the learning required of the physician. 

The field has broadened in other directions. Man no longer has a monopoly of the 
profession. A woman can now enter the college, and run the race neck and neck with her 
brother. Who knows but that some one of us may win renown in this line in the years to 

come! We may be proud to say, "Know Dr. ? Why, she was a schoolmate of 

mine at Lasell." 

Certainly, we all have great encouragement through the lectures of our talented Dr. 
Latham. Can we ever forget our Saturday lectures? Is not the oft- repeated statement, 
" Eat wholesome food, wear proper clothing, and breathe good fresh air! " graven in letters 

(66) 



of burnished gold in the mind of each one of us? And this is not the only maxim fixed in 
letters ineffaceable within our noble intellects. On every side — tier upon tier — they rise. 
"Breathe ! " " Cultivate a cheerful disposition ! " " Digest your food ! " " Remember the 
ounce of prevention ! " and high above all, in blazing letters of fire, " Young ladies, CLEAR 
THE TRACK!" 

We have another division of our Medical Department, presided over by Miss Nutt. 
What should we do without our kind nurse to bind up wounded ankles and to rub aching 
backs ! And some one must attend to those awful Sunday colds and that wretched tired 
feeling that always follows an evening" at the Symphony concert. It is remarkable how all 
the little worries and ills of the whole week throng in on Sunday morning, until one feels 
" completely used up," and just " too horrid to think of going to church." But even with this 
extraordinary Sunday disease to contend with — an epidemic which usually lasts from the 
first of October until the first of June — our "weights and measures" are truly astonishing. 

Imagine a merry band of school-girls disporting themselves upon our classic lawn. In 
the centre, our pride, our " airy fairy Lilian " of a girl, avoirdupois two hundred pounds, and 
waist measure just forty inches. How happy and round and rosy they look — all but one, 
our tiniest. See the great tear course slowly down her cheek as she gazes with envy and 
longing upon her more fortunate sisters. Do not weep, my child ; only follow our never- 
failing maxims and cultivate a Lasell appetite, and we warrant success. 

Hark ye, readers ! Have ye acquaintances, friends, or kinsmen exceeding lean and 
desiring a more generous supply of adipose? Send them to Lasell ! 



(67^ 



'LASELL LEAVES." 



" Dux Feniina Facti. 



Published monthly, during the School Year, by Lasell Publishing Association. 



FIRST TERM. 
Harriet Noble . Editor-in-Chief. 

Business Ma7iager. 
Ida O. Short. 

Associate Editors. 
Alice Andreesen, Virginia Wyckoff, 

Lottie F. Appel. 

Local Editor. Exchange Editor. 

May Tulleys. Grace E. Loud. 

SuI)scription Agent. 
Mary R. Wiggin. 



SECOND TERM. 

Virginia Wyckoff . Editor-in- Cliief. 

Business Manager. 
Ida O. Short. 

Associate Editors. 

Edith D. Partridge, Helen B. Morris, 

May Tulleys. 



Local Editor. 



Exchangee Editor. 



Caroline L. Steel. Carolyn E. Oilman. 

Subscription Agent. 
Orace L. Allen. 



THIRD TERM. 

Alice Andreesen, Presidcjit. 

Elizabeth McEchron, Vice-President. Lottie Appel, Secretary. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Edith Partridge. 

Associate Editors. 
Elizabeth 'W. Fleming, Orace Robb, 

Cara Sawin. 



Local Editor. 
Helen B. Medsker. 



Exchange Editor. 
Marie McDonald. 

(68) 



Subscription Agent. 
Stella B. Cady. 



STUDIO. 




Mary E. Aston, 
Lilian M. Baker, 

Mabelle A. Barnard, 
Elizabeth C. Bennett, 
Helen W. Boss, 
Mae A. Burr, 
Ellen A. Chase, 
Maude W. Clark, 
Maud G. Furniss, 
Grace S. Holmes, 



Florence M. Holmes, 
Helen A. Holden, 
Abby S. Hooper, 
Carrie B, Johnson, 
Helen F. Johnson, 
Minnie P. Kiesel, 
Mary G. Kelley, 
Anna P. Kellogg, 
Sally C. King, 

Bessie S. Latimer, 



Bertha A. Lillibridge, 
Grace E. Loud, 
Harriet Noble, 
Ava F. Rawleigh, 
L. Mabel Sawyer, 
Esther Scouller, 
Sibyl H. Spaulding, 
Margaret Stewart, 
Mabel C. Taylor, 

Carrie W. Van Sickle. 



(69) 



LASELLIA FOREVER. 



AWAY from our homes and the hearthstone so dear, 
Away from a father and mother, 
Away from the scenes where the sky is so clear, 
Away from a sister and brother, — 
Away from them all, we long for the hour 
When we clasp friendly hands in Lasellia's bower. 



This bower is not rich in the trappings of wealth, 
No jewels are there shining brightly : 

Her treasures are spirits rejoicing in health. 
Who follow their queen tripping lightly. 

Oh, joy, when the week bursts forth into flower. 

And our gala we hold in Lasellia's bower ! 



Lasellia, our queen, is a fostering guide, 
She leads us along the time river — 

The past and the present commingled in flow 
Are washing the life banks forever. 

Roll on, we can cry, we fear not thy power, 

Our treasures are safe in LaselHa's bower ! 



But now we come forth from our lovely retreat, 
And bring in our hands of our treasure ; 

Lasellia's fond maidens rejoicingly greet 
These faces that smile for our pleasure. 

Your favor we ask, and this be your dower. 

Some day you shall peep in Lasellia's bower. 

(70) 



OUR S. D. 



T 



HE cheerful daylight now has flown, 
And darkness settles o'er the lea. 

What though winds wail with saddest moan, 
Yet joyous is our own S. D. 



Now list ! within that mystic throng 
Rare voices gently, sweetly float ; 

Like incense breath of prayer and song 
Swells out that solemn, soulful note. 

With high resolve and lofty aim, 

From envious arts and wiles most free, 

These maidens hear no words of blame, 
They are our sisters — our S. D. 

When duty calls — away, away, 

Their tasks to learn, their pens to wield ; 



Hope beckons on, points to the day 

When they shall help in life's broad field. 

Wealth of youth and love and learning ! 

How we rejoice that these may be ! 
Wealth of joy so oft returning. 

Thou e'er art found in our S. D. 

What though the future bids us part. 
And sunders all these tender ties, 

Yet will there linger round each heart 
A vision as of Paradise. 

A gleam that like a sunbeam bright. 
On mountain side or deep blue sea. 

Shall gild each path with purest light — 
Blest mem'ries of our dear S. D. 



(70 




OFFICERS. 



President, 

Miss McMartin. 

Secretary, 

Miss Walston. 



Eater-in- Chief, 
Miss Healy. 



Chaplain, 
Miss Eckford. 



Vice-President, 

Miss Carpenter. 

Ti'easurer, 

Miss Holden. 



Caterer, 

Miss Burr. 



(72) 



THE EATING-CLUB OF LASELL SEMINARY. 



WE, the undersigned, feeling the need of a better cultivation and promotion of the fine art of 
eating, do ordain and establish this constitution of the Eating-Club of Lasell Seminary. 

I. All powers herein granted shall be vested in the majority vote of this club. 

II. The officers shall be a President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer. 

It shall be the duty of these officers to promulgate the aesthetics of fine eating, and from time 
to time write and publish articles on " The Cultivation of Capacity." 

III. No person shall be eligible to election who has not a natural aptitude along the lines on 
which the club runs, or who has not cultivated the art of long eating. 

IV. Any member showing signs of failing appetite shall be expelled at once, and the vacancy so 
made filled at the next meeting. 

V. The act of leaving anything on the plate or the table shall constitute treason, and the guilty 
party shall be put out. 

The vacancy may be filled at the same meeting. 

VI. All members must pledge themselves to spend the majority of their time at the table, and 
no meal shall be cut. 

VIL Their motto shall be, 

" Eat all you get and get all you can." 



Miss Mabel Crocker, 
Miss Cushing, 
Miss Sara Bond, 
Miss Alice Andreesen, 
Miss Anna Miller, 
Miss Ava Rawleigh, 
Miss Cara Sawin, 
Miss Frances Holmes, 
Miss Ruth Seiberling, 



Miss Maude Day, 
Miss Belle Morrow, 
Miss Mae Healy, 
Miss Helen Holden, 
Miss Anna Walston, 
Miss Georgie Belle Davis, 
Miss Mamie Ranney, 
Miss Winifred Conlin, 
Miss Nelle Davis. 



C73) 



MENU 



Fruit. 




Bananas. 


Oranges. 


Cereals. 




Oatmeal. 


Mush 


Meats. 




Chops. Ham 


and Eggs. 



Apples. 
Farina. 

Steak. 

Vegetables. 

Baked Potatoes. Mashed Potatoes. 

French Fried Potatoes. 



Corn. 



Breads. 
Rolls. 



Toast. 



Relishes. 

Catsup. Worcestershire Sauce. Epicurean. 

Cocoa. Coffee. Milk. 



LUNCH. 

Fish. 

Smoked Cod. Sardines. 

Salads. 

Potato. Salmon. 

Meats. 
Hash a la dish. Tongue a la slice. 

Vegetables. 
Potatoes a la wafer. 

Cakes. 
Griddled avec sweet sauce. 

Bread. 

White. Graham. Biscuits avec honey. 

Puddings. 

Pudding a la crumbs. Canned Fruit. Cream. 



DINNER. 



Beef. 



Vegetable. 



Soup. 
Amber. Bean. 

Fish. 
White. 

Roasts. 
Spring Lamb a la pease. 

Salads. 



Chicken. Salmon a la mustard dressing. 



Veal. 



Beans. 



Epicurean. 



Vegetables. 
Corn. 

Relishes. 
Radishes. 



Tomatoes. 



Pickles. 



Dessert. 

Apple and Squash Pie. 

Sherbet and Vanilla Cream. 

Coffee and Lemon Jelly. 
Nuts. Raisins. Candy. 



(74) 



0^1^ 3^^^^^' pamilies anb 'o^eir ^^arious Callings. 

ZTbe Ibolmes ffantil^. 

p^RESH-AlR THE/nON ^OL/nnS TRAVELLING HUnORlST (ALWAYS ORIGINAL) 

^YRATING JkpiNSTER ^OL/AES LEADER OF THE BAND 

JPaTTY y^ONASTlCAL ^OLA\ES -. . . PHYSICAL CULTURE 

(IjBELISK /-10L/^\ES EDITOR OF ENCYCLOPEDIA AND TRENCH DICTIONARY 

Zbc 3obmon ifamil^. 

(TMA/nELEON JRaNK-NOTE JOMNSON . . . . . TEACHER OF /^ATHEnATICAL BRANCHES 

•f ABBERING J^ ESTER JOHNSON SWITCH TENDER 

jReLATED YDrOWSY JOHNSON MANUFACTURER OF Tl/^\EPIECES 

r^RAVlTY^^NACONDA joHNSON /^pg-rHF-rir OCULIST 

(75) 





Cooking Classes. 



THIRD Year. 



cJENNlE n. ARNOLD 

L. MABEL CASE 

NELLE G. DAVIS 

cIESSlE /n, GASKILL 

nARY A\, niLLER 

nOLLlE S. TAYLOR 

E/nA\A L. WHITE 



SPECIALS. 



LOUISE C. WHITNEY 



HELEN W. BOSS 

LAURA R. CO/nSTOCK 

ANNA E. CROCKER 

ELIZABETH W. PLEAMNG 

cJUNE r\. HOYT 

CARRIE B. cJOHNSON 

yniNNlE B. KIESEL 

BERTHA nERRYMAN 

ELIZABETH STEPHENSON 

A\ARTHA B. STONE 
(76) 



A WONDERFUL TALE. 



LITTLE charm a maiden bore, — 
Oh ! listen to this wondrous tale ! — 
On which all maidens set a store, 
If they've learned at Lasell the cooking-lore. 
Oh ! listen to my wondrous tale ! 

Now this little loaf of golden hue — 

Listen to this wondrous tale ! — 
She'd won at school as her lawful due. 
Because she could the best bread brew,* 
And also make the nicest stew. 

Oh ! isn't this a wonderful tale ! 

She proudly bore it to the West, — 

Listen to my wonderful tale ! — 
And all her mates who'd tried the test, 
And had kneaded and baked with equal zest 

(But hadn't got the prize), 
Bade her good-by with laugh and jest. 

Oh ! listen to this wondrous tale ! 

She reached her home in highest glee, 

The maid of this wonderful tale ! 
But what is this her bright eyes see ? 
Why, the cook in the parlor witli her company, 
While down below are the family. 

Oh ! listen to this sad, sad tale ! 

Yes, cook has become the " Queen of the Home," 
Which isn't such a wonderful tale ; 



And the family poor are forced to roam 
In the kitchen below, to find a bone 
And to learn to do what they never have known. 
Oh ! listen to this mournful tale ! 

But into the kitchen goes this maiden wise, — 

Just hear this wonderful tale ! 
She tries her hand at cakes and pies, 
Which never fall, for they always rise. 
And nobody believes their very own eyes. 

Oh ! isn't this a wonderful tale ! 

The " Queen of the Home, " in a fearful rage, — 

Listen to my wonderful tale ! — 
Straightway leaves without even her wages, 
While the " bereaved " family thinks this an age 

Of the most wonderful tales. 

For thereupon all their troubles flee, — 

Listen to this wonderful tale ! 
They go about in the highest glee. 
They never are all with the " dyspepsy," 
And all their meals are cooked to a T 

By the maid of this wonderful tale. 

And to what is all this wonder due. 

In this wonderful, wonderful tale? 
Why, to the little loaf of golden hue. 
To its fairy spell and its magic too ; 

Yes, that makes this wonderful tale ! 



* Poetical license . 



(77) 



SENIOR STATISTICS. 



NAME. 


Resident 
State. 


Highest 
Ambition. 


Vis/'osition. 


Matrimonial 
Prospects. 


Destiny. 


Knovjn as. 


Characteristic 
Expression. 


Jennie M. Arnold . . 


Mass. 


Looking up 
Hebrew trans- 
lations. 


Bashful. 


Glimmering. 


Wait and see. 


" Biddle." 


Oh ! it's the 
faculty. 


Eva L. Couch .... 


Me. 


To steal the for- 
bidden "Rose." 


Anytliing but 
sweet. 


Rosy pros- 
pects. 


Doctor. 


" Couchie." 


You don't mean 
it. 


Nellie G. Davis . . . 


111. 


Dress 
reform. 


Meek. 


No one good 
enough. 


Looking after Ben's 
wants. 


"Nell." 


Blame the 
expense. 


Clara Eades 


111. 


To be a giraffe. 


Too dictatorial. 


Disappointed. 


Brushing cobwebs 
off of the sky. 


"Cledes." 


Oh ! great 
scots. 


Elizabeth Ewing . . 


Kan. 


Know her chem- 
istry just once. 


Differs with 
surroundings. 


Not yet.* 


Electioneering for 
Democratic 
Presidents. 


"Bettie." 


Ohl now. 


Flora M. Gardner . . 


111. 


Run the 
Lasellia Club. 


Overbearing. 


Waiting and 
watching. 


Have a peanut stand 

at the Columbian 

Exposition. 


" Fogie." 


S'perb. 


Jessie M. Gaskill . . 


R.I. 


Ramble in the 
woods. 


? 


Soon. 


Leader of Salvation 
Army. 


"Jess." 


Is that so? 


Harriet M. Noble . 


Ohio. 


Wait in Huy- 
ler's for street- 
car. 


Reserved. 


Who knows? 


Lawyer. 


"Good-nature." 


Well, I declare. 


Bessie M. Pennell. . 


Kan. 


To occupy two 
rooms. 


Perfectly 
harmless. 


Too young. 


Travel with Mr. 
Spaulding.J 


" Little Pen- 
nell." 


Gigger. 


Nellie M. Richards . 


Mass. 


Xot to be 

troubled with 

trunks when 

travelling. 


Sportive. 


N'ever.f 


Keep house for 
mamma. 


" Goon." 


My stars and 
apple blossoms. 


Esther ScouUer . . . 


Pa. 


How to conju- 
gate French 
verbs. 


Jovial. 


Has her cap set. 


Circus rider. 


" Essie." 


Patch it. 


Ida O. Short 


Pa. 


Write the 
essays for the 
whole of the 
Senior Class. 


Suits 
everybody. 


Time yet. 


Stop shoi't — never 
to go again. 


" Idie." 


Y-e-s. 


Effie E. Symns . . . 


Kan. 


To be arrested 
for fast driving. 


Reckless. 


In cupid's net. 


To do just as the 
king — commands. 


" Squires." 


You old cow. 



* Has to get Annie off first. 



t Mamma will not give her up. 

(78) 



J Not the lecturer. 



ODE TO THE HIGH AND MIGHTY SENIORS. 



(Imitating the style of Euripides as much as possible.) 



'7'7 TATCH around me, ye poetical muses; 
vAyL Lead my pen in the way it should go, 

While I sing my song of the Senior class, 
And give me words to express their self-conceit. 



Alas ! Yea, alas ! for that Senior class, 

It would overawe all innocent and unobtrusive classes ; 

But there are individuals in these classic halls 

That will not be daunted by that class. 



Verily, thou art a peculiar specimen, 
Having such an abnormal knowledge of all branches 
That you have no need of the study card, 
Except in class meetings. 



But why sing of the members of '93 ? 

Because it sets a good example to younger classes, 

Especially in English, 

When a smile is never seen upon thy mobile features. 



Thou art also worthy of mention because of thy vast wealth, 

Thou art indeed daughters of Croesus (millionaires) ; 

For are not thy closets well lined with last year's Alierlei? 

And thou art also liberal with advice. 

For these reasons we sing of thee, 

O wonderful, peculiar, extraordinary '93 ! 

(79) 




ORPHEAN CLUB. 



Grace L. Allen, 
Alice Andreesen, 
Julia W. Anderson, 
Lottie F. Appel, 
Jennie M. Arnold, 
Helen W. Boss, 
K. Belle Bragdon, 
Louise Bull, 
Mae a. Burr, 

Helen W. Cleaveland, 
Winifred T. Conlin, 
Maud Day, 

Fannie V. Fairchild, 



Elizabeth W. Fleming, 
Hattie L. Freebey, 
Flora M. Gardner, 
Mary M. Healey, 
Lestra M. Hibberd, 
JuLL4 E. Hogg, 
Frances D. Holmes, 
Alice J. Houghton, 
Jane M. Hoyt, 
Grace A, Johnson, 
Carrie B. Johnson, 
Minnie P. Kiesel, 
Mary F. Lathrop, 

rso) 



Grace E. Loud, 

Nellie M. Richards, 
Harrieite G. Scott, 
Mary Seaman, 

Clara B. Simpson, 
Grace Snyder, 
Mabel Taylor, 

Mabel Tomlinson, 

LiLLIE S. TUKEY, 

May Tulleys, 
Jamie L. Watson, 
Emma L. White. 



PiANoroRTE Quartettes. 



II. 



BELLE BRAGDON 



cJENNlE A\. ARNOLD 



LESTRA /n. HIBBERD 



ANNA E. CROCKER 



NELLIE RICNARDS 



/nARY /n. /niLLER 



A\R. hlLLS 



/niLDRED WARREN 



III. 



IV. 



URSULA KING 



ELIZABETH /ncECMRON 



ANNA r. CUSniNG 



WINNIERED T. CONLIN 



CARRIE T. AAANNING 



LOUISE ZSCMETZSCflE 



RUTH V. SAN KEY 



SARA MAYDEN 



(81; 



THE FRENCH CLUB. 



nx 



'ITH meteoric brilliancy and quickness the star of the French Club rose and fell on the vision 
of Lasell. 

One day rumors were heard of a club at whose meetings nothing but French should be 
spoken ; then one evening a meeting was held in the S. D. room, to which a brilliant few were admitted, 
and an excited clamor of " C'est vrai je ne sais pas " and " What did she say? " arose and drifted out of 
the windows to the ears of the girls in the third-story rooms on the east wing. A litde after nine the 
crowd climbed wearily to their rooms, a tired but happy expression on their faces. 

A few days after, the treasurer, with an important air and a note-book in her, hand, went around 
and collected the " cinquante sous, no centimes, no sous, which was it anyhow?" and the great 
" C^nacle " was fliirly organized. 

For a while the excitement was furious. It is reported that some of the iiiembers even talked 
French in their dreams. 

Books were procured and every one began to learn her part for a play, which, as the outsiders 
were condescendingly informed, was to take place in the gymnasium the night before the Christmas 
vacation, and the school was to be invited. 

Soon, however, a curious malady began to afflict the members. They would be apparently well 
and happy all the week until Wednesday evening just before the half-past seven bell, when they would 
retire to their rooms declaring they were ill. Soon, when asked, each girl replied : "Oh, no, I don't 
belong." Presently the meetings dwindled to mademoiselle and Richard, who faithfully lighted the gas 
and grinned cheerful French until mademoiselle was satisfied that no one was coming. 

Now the room is darkened, and at the appointed hour none but the spirits whisper, " Oii sont- 
elles?" 

So like a brilliant soap-bubble and scores of other things, the gay but learned French Club 
vanished into mist. 

(82) 



NOS MOUVEMENTS GIRATOIRES. 




HE faculty, once on a time, 
Resolved all forces to combine. 
And so they'd take our nerves to train. 
And thus we ease and grace would gain. 
Said one, " As you will plainly see. 
Our girls must strong and active be : 
Rencontre avec le froid froid monde, 
Toujours they'll have a lasting bond." 
Each racks in vain his learned head 
Until one earnest voice has said : 
" I've solved the problem ! You shall see 
Quelles agiles demoiselles they'll be." 
" Hear ! hear ! " each voice in triumph cried, 
And vowed this method should be tried. 
Enfin ! the day — then to the CALL 
The girls come trooping one and all, 
And each is eagerness to see 
Whate'er the wondrous scheme might be. 
Sans doute, it much impression made, 
Pour maintenant all plans are laid, 
En prendre the world at large d'assaut 
With graceful gestures — comme il faut. 
Mais ! allons ! et peut-etre c'est vrai 
We'll spy upon these maidens gay. 
And see the many quirk's and quirls 
Which are imposed on all our girls. 
Ma foi ! we view them in dismay, 
All seated there in strange array. 
But watching mouvements gu-atoires 
Compels trop vite de I'eau camphor. 
As like a palm or lily fair 
We see them swaying in the air. 
We catch our breath lest by some fate 
They may in countless pieces break. 
And still our wonder grows as we 



A strange and fearful sight do see. 

A maiden's graceful form we view — 

Any more graceful? Pas du tout. 

Then limp, inanimate, we spy 

This portion of humanity 

Li every weird position thrown 

As if she were a bag of stone ; 

AVhen in a twinkling from her place 

She rises with such ease and grace 

That all the girls, with one desire, 

Faire la meme chose, do now aspire ; 

And such a twisting and a turning. 

All former laws of nature spurning, 

That anxiously we seek some sign 

Of girlish human form divine. 

At last they stand in single file. 

The bell ! Voila ! A beaming smile, 

A deep'ning hush ; then toward the door 

They glide "more quiet than e'er before." 

As home we wend our weary way. 

We think of what we've seen this day. 

And over our bewildered brain 

Steal pensees fraught with greatest pain ; 

And to our lasting shame we say it. 

That still we'd rather go than pay it, 

The same ungraceful, awkward gait 

That jusqu' alors has been our fate. 



L'epilogue. 

Voyez ! in prophecy we see 
The future Lasell compagnie. 
Now we'll this much reveal to you, 
llicfre gracefulness itself ! C'est tout. 



(84) 



THE FACULTY 



S 



INCE long before the present time, 
There have been at Lasell — 

Which school the situation is 
In Auburndale, they tell, — 



There have been Juniors every year, 
But none to come, nor yet before, 

In wisdom, wit, or intellect. 

Can reach the class of ninety-four. 

As is the custom in this school. 

Each year the Juniors print 
A book of poems, prose, and grinds, 

And put some pictures in't. 

So time has come for us to try 
Our hand at making rhymes. 

And our book surely will surpass 
All those of former times. 

'Tis strange, 'tis true, but we'll confess 
That when our grinding's done. 

We joy the most in raiHng at 
The teachers, one by one ; 

For 'tis they who haunt us, tire us 
With their never-ending store ; 

First they cram us, then they squelch us, 
Thus they prove one constant bore. 



Do you wonder when the time comes 

That we can retaliate. 
That our hearts beat wild with joy 

To recapitulate their fate? 

So we'll be sincere, and tell you 
All the faults the teachers own. 

All their graces, gifts, and follies. 
Both together and alone. 

Foremost in this noble army 

Stands our generous-hearted chief: 

He with best intentions ever 
For his girls. Yet what relief 

Do we all feel ! for now we joy 

In chapel sessions much more short ; 

Since to the Old World he has gone. 
No more to us can he exhort. 

His " bits " no more do tire our souls 
As from " Zion's Herald " he reads ; 

But still we do his counsel miss, 
His chiding for our deeds, 

His inky locks, his features spare. 

His mad, impetuous ways ; 
His eyes can look us through and through 

With their soul-searching gaze. 



rss) 



While he is on his pilgrimage 
Another takes his place, 

Resembling much a patriarch, 
And rubicund of face. 

His voice is like the distant sound 
Of some far-rolling thunder, 

When he to pupils doth expound, 
Or when they make a blunder. 

His hearing is not very good. 

But after repetition 
He always manages to hear 

Each answer or petition. 

Of all the noted women 

On record in Lasell, 
Is Caroline A. Carpenter, 

Most difficult to tell. 

Her ways are all past finding out. 
Sarcastic, smiling, bland ; 

An adept at cross- questioning — 
To vanquish her takes '* sand." 

A terror to delinquents 
Who come to table late, 

Because of curling many locks 
Upon a hollow pate. 

For curling-irons she abjures 
As needless in this world. 

She'd rather have us look passce 
Than spend time getting curled. 

'Tis well to have a mera'ry good. 
But not so well to know 

The Lasell catalogue by heart. 
And say it off so-so. 



Thus knows our worthy preceptress 
Each rule that governs here, 

And will not vary in the least 
For e'en her dearest dear. 

Miss Carpenter's her right-hand man, 
From her she takes advice ; 

And with Miss C. behind the throne. 
Life's not so very nice. 

" Of course you see how 'tis yourself, 

I cannot let you go." 
The while her hands she wildly wrings. 

She firmly answers " No." 

She tells us not to dress in style. 
Would have us modern cranks 

In dress reform in all its lines ; 
For which she gets no thanks. 

"Where are you at?" she sternly asks; 

Then we foresee our doom. 
For 'tis against her stringent rules 

To sleep out of one's room. 

'Tis science tells her how unsafe 
For three to spend the night 

In rooms whose size is two by four — 
Still, how we wish we might ! 

Sir H. L. R., the chemist learned, 

Can pictures deftly take. 
And all may at the great World's Fair 

His work investigate. 

For here he will display with care 

Not only photos fine. 
But he'll tell you all, most gladly, 

His "idears" in that hne. 



(86) 



In choir most thoroughly he works 
With all his might and main, 

Bowing and jerking with each beat 
His head and hands and frame ; 

But yet he knows so much withal 
Concerning this i-ich earth, 

That to hear him talk on " strater " 
You'd get all your money's worth. 

In unconspicuous attire 

Illumed by necktie red, 
His heart burns with consuming fire, 

His glance fills us with dread. 

As has been mentioned here before, 

He has a massive brain, 
His heart is also of great size. 

With room for maiden's — twain. 

Besides his own fair favored one 

He secretly adores ; 
He gives her candy by the ton 

And sends no end of flowers. 

A pond'rous person, slow but sure. 

Is next for us to treat ; 
Of generous proportions she. 

And corresponding feet. 

And in the realm of algebra, 

Or any mathematics. 
Or in the missionary field, 

She's the greatest of fanatics. 

On dress reform she also dotes. 
Nor wears her hair in curl ; 

And believes to be in comfort dressed 
The duty of each girl. 



From science now we turn to art, 
Where soul- inspiring thought. 

In colors rich and rare and bright, 
By master-hand is taught. 

The Salon marked him for its own, 

But now he is our prize ; 
And from his soaring tendencies 

He's found up near the skies. 

To concerts oft he takes a crowd, 

And worries a great deal 
For fear lest down some dark side street 

One'll slip, as doth an eel. 

He takes precautions them to count. 
His vigilance ne'er slumbers, 

And at each corner makes them halt, 
While there he each one numbers. 

His face a blushing rose is like. 
His talk oft lacks coherence ; 

He much resembles old Vandyck 
In personal appearance. 

Now music our attention claims, 

With its two devotees : 
The one who works the Orphean Club, 

The other pounds the keys. 

He is endowed with much conceit, 

The other does not lack it ; 
His room is full of noisy sounds. 

He's an expert at a racket. 

His aches and pains are oft retailed 

To pupils sympathetic ; 
While Mr. Davis' handsome face 

Would please the most aesthetic. 



(87) 



Our French lessons are said to one 
Whose manner's most abrupt. 

She sends us to the Study Hall, 
Gets "rattled" at acts corrupt. 

Her eyes are black, her hair also, 

Her feet not very small ; 
She gave up learning how to fence, 

For fear she'd take a fall. 

America to her is dear. 

She gives us lessons long, 
She plays upon the violin, 

But indulges not in song. 

A petite person next we see, 

She's little, but — oh, my ! 
And she goes prying, peeking 'round 

Most conscientiously. 

The Crazy Alley evil-doers 

She marketh for her own ; 
She sits there by her open door, 

All by herself alone. 

She will not take an " Ich weiss nicht " 

For any answer given. 
And tells us we must study more, 

Tho' we've already striven. 

She is the most inquisitive 

Of all the teachers here. 
The sister of the fraulein 

Who instructed us last year. ' 

The daughter of her " fnamma /tear" 
Knows Latin some and Greek ; 

She's tall and thin, and has light hair, 
Her tastes are most unique. 



She seems quite fond of scolding. 
Wants things her own sweet way. 

And if at table we want more 
To eat, she'll say us " Nay." 

" There are some things, young ladies. 

Not to be asked for twice, 
So do not pass a second time 

Your plates, for 'tis not nice." 

Miss Shinn, all say, is ever sweet, 

Beloved by every one ; 
She tells us how to speak a piece, 

And court'sy when 'tis done. 

'Tis hard enough to go to church. 
And sit the long hours through ; 

But harder still to take down notes, 
And write the sermons too. 

Our English teacher 'tis whose rule 
Requires each week this work, 

And squelches every one who dares 
This constant duty shirk. 

She's large, good-hearted, and talks well. 
Her language's most correct, 

But still her voice is apt to squeak, 
Whene'er you'd least expect. 

Then Miss McMartin athletes shows. 

She's liked by every one ; 
Her face is sweet, she dances well, 

And this year Gym's great fun. 

But still when toward the practice rooms 

We hear her lightly tread. 
We shake for those who're skipping, 

Since to make up time all dread. 



(88) 



Our nursie next the word demands, 

'Tis she our health preserves, 
Prescribing harmless sugar pills 

As tonic for the nerves. 

Her liquid compounds we can drink 

Without a thought of fear ; 
Her pet reliefs the watei--bag, 

" 'Twill make you better, dear." 

But when we fain would stay from church, 

On wicked pleasure bent, 
'Tis then she leaves us in the lurch, 

To this she'll not consent. 

A typical New England maid, 

She burns with fire internal. 
And though she is a good sound Niitt, 

No one has claimed the kernel. 

Fear not — we have not left thee out, 

Nor do we yet intend to, 
For "last's the best of all the game," 

And we would not offend you. 

As librarian she presides — 
Her motto should be Mizpah ; 

She watches with an eagle's eye 
For all who dare to whisper. 



She knows more than the books by name. 

For them she's reading ever ; 
From preface to the grand finis 

Devours she with endeavor. 

She makes one think of some wise owl, 

Absorbed in contemplation, 
Or little ostrich in the song. 

Dispensing information. 

Or still like our own geyser great. 
Which from its constant spouting 

Is called " Old Faithful " — so is she 
Her knowledge never doubting. 

Perhaps you have not yet discerned 

Whose character portray we : 
She wore the cap and gown last Jime, 

'Tis our "Old Faithful" Witherbee. 

Where e'er they be. 

On land or sea, 
Lasell girls all agree with me. 

That truth I've told, 

Though rather bold, 
And hope the teachers will not scold. 



(89) 



NATATORIUM. 





MAID must never leave Lasell 
Until she's learned to swim, 

For the act some day, we cannot tell. 
May save both life and limb. 



The first lesson in the harness 

Is awful, to be sure ; 
But if you wish to learn to swim, 

The fright you must endure. 

Then when you've learned to move your 
hands, 

And kick your feet to match. 
They take the harness off of you. 

And send you forth unbacked. 



The first two strokes you feel quite brave. 

Then, with a gurgling moan. 
You wildly clutch at empty air, 

And sink to worlds unknown. 

Down, down you go beneath the wave, 

You think you're going miles. 
You know you're drowned — a long farewell 

To loved ones' praise and smiles. 



You do not know how long you're there, 

It may be months or years. 
But the friendly pole thrust in your hand 

Soon quiets all your fears. 

It is not always thus, my friends. 
If it were, few would survive ; 

One or two more lessons, and — oh, bliss 
You've learned to jump and dive. 



(90) 



THE GROCERY STORE. 



O 



I. 



H, Auburndale's a lively town, 

Its attractions are a score ; 
Yet to the Sem girls most alluring by far 

Is the little grocery store. 



There what luxuries unknown 

Are arrayed within ! 
Chocolates, caramels, pickles, and cake 

Tempt the innocent ones to sin. 



Oh, were it not for that little back door, 
What would the Lasell girl do ? 

And many a penny the grocer would lose, 
Should he fail to the girls to be true. 



Many a spread would never have been 

But for the grocery store ; 
And when you have been there in safety once. 

You are sure to visit it more. 




But when caught in the acts, oh, horrors ! 

For teachers do frequent that street, 
And when you are summoned to meet Mrs. E. 

The pleasure is far from sweet. 



Then there's an end to all fun for the term. 

And life is bitter indeed ; 
And frowned on by faculty, greatest and least, 
What a sorry existence we lead ! 
Moral. 
Now take my advice, O gentle maid. 

Shun every grocery store, 
For you're sure to get caught when having some fun, 
And then — misery forevermore ! 

(91) 



LOVE'S SWEET DREAM. 



SHOULD you ask me whence this story, 
Whence this tale of love and wooing, 
With its joys and with its sorrows, 
With its lesson which we should learn, 
I should answer, I should tell you, 
" From the country of New England, 
From the land of our forefathers. 
From the State of Massachusetts, 
From the town of Auburndale." 
Should you ask me why I'm weeping, 
As the thoughts pass quickly o'er me, 
Thoughts so sad that they 'most " floor me,' 
I should answer, I should tell you, 
" It's because the story's touching, 
And because I'm tender-hearted, 
And it pains me to remember 
How those dear, sweet, charming maidens 
Were so jilted by their lover — 
Right in the 'one-two-three' order — - 
As the other girls looked onward." 

It all happened in this manner : 
To Lasell School for young ladies. 



Situated right near Boston, 

In the region of the ocean. 

In '91, the month September, 

From Lake Michigan, the west shore, 

Came a girl to work and study. 

To increase her knowledge greatly ; 

Hair and eyes both dark, sweet-looking; 

Fascinated all who knew her. 

At Lasell, for two years, had been 
Another girl, herself most lovely. 
Light, fine-looking, and m,ost jolly; 
Dancing firmly she believed in. 
To distinguish her from others 
And to make the story clearer. 
Let us call her — say — " Carnation," 
And the first one, tho' we know her 
And it seems indeed quite needless. 
Let us call her " Violetta." 
Now, to proceed with the story : 
Violetta, as we have said. 
Came to Lasell in September, 
Came, you know, to work and study. 



(92) 



Short was the time she had been there, 
When in Carnation's heart there sprang up 
Affections which grew only stronger 
For her as the days passed onward. 
How she loved her, how she worshipped 
Everything which she did handle ! 

Things went on until December ; 

Still Carnation's love grew stronger. 

Then it was that on her finger 

Violetta put her own ring, 

There to stay till death should part them, 

So to prove that there between them 

Was affection deep and earnest. 

But with '92's Commencement 
Violetta's love grew weaker, 
And her actions grew they cooler 
Toward her precious, darling true-love. 
Then the Lenten season came on, 
And the girls stopped eating candy ; 
With the dear boys stopped their flirting 
(Some great sacrifice they must make). 
Stopped did they for just ten hours — 
Then went at it more than ever. 
Meanwhile our two charming lovers 
Had a score or more of quarrels. 
And the ring on " Carnie's " finger 
Was returned to her who gave it. 
Broken-hearted was Carnation, 



I But she showed it very little, 

i 

Kept it to herself so closely 

That but few did know how wretched 

Her life was and always would be. 

'Twas not so with Violetta, 

For, you see, she cared not any — 

Cared not whether " Carnie " loved her 

Or loved another even more so ; 

For the truth, I must confess it, 

Was that she herself was in love 

With another, tall and stately. 

"Lily," for it's that we'll call her. 

Was a Senior in that same year, 

And a beauty was she also — 

She with eyes so black in color. 

Her did 'Letta love most truly. 

And for it, as a slight return, 

Lily gave up all her close friends, 

Gave herself up to her lover. 

Then did Violetta bring out 

The same ring which poor Carnation 

Wore upon her finger only 

From mid-winter until Easter ; 

Bade her put it on her finger. 

Wear and treasure 'bove all others. 

As a pledge of her devotion. 

Deep and earnest in its nature. 

Spring passed on, and so the school year 
Passed away, the girls went homeward ; 



^91) 



Seniors to be gone forever, 

Others to return September. 

Thus our lovers, so devoted, 

From each other were they parted. 

And to each life was most wretched. 

Caused by absence of the other. 

Like true lovers, separated. 

To each other wrote they daily. 

Till they could stand it no longer 

(The separation, not the writing) ; 

And one day in sunny July, 

Lily went to visit 'Letta. 

Then it was that they were happy — 

Ah, so happy ! Oh, so happy ! 

Just like any other lovers 

Who've been absent from each other. 

Summer gone, the fall beginning, 
Lasell again with girls was lively ; 
Some were gay and very giddy. 
But some were, oh ! so very homesick. 
Violetta and Carnation 
Both returned to work and study, 
To increase their knowledge greatly. 
But our Lily, she returned not. 
And poor 'Letta, she did grieve so. 
Then it was that fair Carnation 
Thought she would again be in it, 
little dreaming that another 
Girl would bob up so serenely. 



In this world all is uncertain, 

One can tell naught of the morrow. 



So it happened Violetta, 
When from Lily was divided. 
Learned to love, yes, quite another, 
Different also from the others. 
For she, "Daisy" we shall call her. 
Was quite small and had clear blue eyes. 
Eyes that twinkled, oh ! so brightly ; 
From dear old Connecticut came she. 
From the piano made she music. 

To keep up her reputation 
As an ardent lover, 'Letta 
Affectionately loved her Daisy, 
Loved her almost to distraction. 
Same as they do in Chicago, 
And are divorced the day after. 

So it was with Violetta. 

Of her Daisy grew she weary. 

And as the days of the New Year 

Rolled along she dropped her flatly — 

Dropped her flatly without warning. 

By the jarring of the dropping 

Daisy's heart was sadly broken, 

And her life, too, made most wretched ; 

But she afterwards recovered. 

And now guards 'gainst fickle lovers. 



(94) 



At exactly the same instant 

'Letta let poor Daisy tumble, 

Picked she up and with her carried 

" Little Pansy," sweet and winning — 

Little Pansy, plump and quiet, 

Dignified and lovely singer. 

Dark eyes, and dark hair so curly. 

'Letta, though she loved the others. 
Even more so loved she Pansy, 
Loved her 'way beyond distraction ; 
And again the ring came forward. 
Which at last reports poor Lily 
Wore and treasured, oh ! so greatly. 
This time on sweet Pansy's finger 



Went the ring, and there it lingers 
To this day, but — how much longer? 

Poor Carnation, Lily, Daisy, 

Each in turn so cruelly jilted 

By their horrid fickle lover. 

By the charming Violetta. 

Oh, take lesson from this story — 

From this sad and truthful story. 

Guard against those naughty wooers. 

Wooers of the dear, sweet maidens, 

Wreckers of so many young lives. 

If they're men guard you against them — 

Doubly guard you — if they're "gi/nils " ! ! ! 



THE MORNING TIMES, APRIL i, 1893. 



NEWS OF THE MORNING. 



Pajje 

LOCAL. 

1. A Fallen Ido]. 

2. W'nrni; uncertain. 

2. Suicide. 

3. Wedding- Bells. 
,^. Social Gossip. 
,5. Ciivirt News. 



NEW ENGLAND. 

Maiden Drills. 
Harvard Notes. 



FOREIGN. 

I. Present State of German 
Society . —Special Despatch 
from H-l-n M-rr-s. 



IN GENERAL. 

Gossip from Washington. 

Personals. 

Poem. 

Music and Drama. 

History of Strikes. 



WEATHER INDICATIONS. 

LOCAL FORECAST. 

Boston, March 31, 8 P.M. 
Indications for Friday even- 
ing : fair, and continued 
warm winds ; but watch out 
— indications as to weather 
are deceptive. 

AUBURNDALE WEATHER. 

Easterly winds; threaten- 
ing rain. 

Yesterday. 

1892 



6A.M 

9A.M 

12 .... 

3P-M 

6 P.M 

*9P.M 

*Lasell midnight. 



34 
42 
4S 

41 
40 

33 



1893. 

32 

40 

52 
52 
46 

43 



"THE MIND." 

Absent Mindedness and How 

to Cure it. 

BY 
B-SS W-NSL-W. 

This treatise is indorsed by 
the leading psychologists of 
Europe and America. The 
author's name is enough to 
make it sell. 



SUICIDE! 

Lasell Colony Startled. 

Attempt to End 
her Life. 



[Special to the Times.'] 
Lasell, April i. The 
attempted suicide last night 
of one of oui- students 
caused intense excitement, 
and the air was filled with 
gossip among the friends of 
the young lady. 

On the night of March 
thirty- first when the night 
watchman was passing 
through the natatorium, a 
ghastly sight met his eyes, 
a body floating in the tank. 
The hasty removal and 
prompt action with vigor- 
ous work soon restored the 
fast-ebbing life. This is 
another case of affections 
crushed. For several days 
past friends had noticed the 
depressed spirits of the 
young lady, but thought it 
was the usual homesick- 
ness. When first missed the 
search was fruitless, and so 
all decided she had grown 
desperate and gone to her 



fond parents. Afterward a 
hastily written note ad- 
dressed to her chum told the 
story. It ran as follows : 

"Life," said she, "has 
become a burden, and all I 
care most for is to sweep 
away this awful agony 
caused by my ideal deserting 
me, and giving her affections 
to another. What do I care 
now for life? Farewell.'''' 

But she has been saved, 
and now sees her folly. So 
we hope this will be a lesson 
to others. 



TWO ILLS. 

Sunday. 

Ache, head; 
Cold, bed ; 
Church, cut, 
Through A'lill. 

Monday. 

Up, well; 
Quite swell; 
Boston nix; 
Bad fix. 

Next Sunday 
All's well; 
Next Monday 
Bills swell. 



HAVE YOU HAIR? 

IF NOT, WHY NOT? 

The Seven Sutherlands Put 
to Flight. 

The discoverer begs to inform 
the public that her new hair 
restorer is now in the market. 
It goes quickly to the spot, and 
covers the bald pate like magic. 

BEWARE of imitations 
peddled from door to door. 

-NN- W-LST-N. 



PERSONALS. 

In a letter dated March 30, 
J-n-e H-yt writes that she 
is enjoying highly North- 
ern New York. " However 
much," she writes, " I en- 
tered into pastoral life during 
the summer, and liked it, I 
have now dipped deeper, and 
find it more fascinating than 



Small gifts of charity are 
seldom thought worthy of 
public attention. But a re- 
cent subscription ought to 
be made public : An intimate 
friend of Miss L-str- H-bb-rd 
has raised a small sum to 
purchase a pair of shoe 
lacings for her. 

Seldom does the feminine 
mind run to the ring. Lasell 
can boast of a prodigy in that 
line, in Fr-nc-s li-lm-s, who 
has at tongue's end all the 
names and abodes, together 
with the present and past 
records, of America's several 
pugilists. 

The many friends of Miss 
L-U-br-dg- will apjireciate 
her disappointment in not 
finding her young gentleman 
caller, April first. 



THE MORNING TIMES, APRIL i, 1893. 



DRAMA AND MUSIC. 

" Ou Sont dont ces 
Messieurs." 

PUBLIC DISAPPOINTED. 

French Artists Fail to 
Appear. 

Little does the public realize 
what a treat it missed in the 
failure to put on the stage 
"Ou Sont dont ces Messieurs." 
The many rehearsals, the care- 
ful costuming by French 
artists, and the new stage 
effects had brought this play to 
a point of perfection. The 
failure of financial matters and 
the growing passion of the 
manager for the fiddle were 
the causes of this failure. 



GRAND CONCERT. 
First Rehearsal Lasell Or- 
chestra. 

A LARGE and enthusiastic 
audience attended the first pub- 
lic rehearsal of the Seminary 
Orchestra, and the many lovers 
of music were given a genuine 
treat. The breadth and scope 
of composition showed the 
writers to have talent possessed 
by few amateurs. 

Some of the pieces given 
during the evening merit more 
than a passing notice. 

" Where Shall I Find Him?" 
a duet in B flat, was beautifully 
rendered bv Signora HoAvlelti 
and Mile. Bu(i)lle. It showed a 
depth of feeling one could not 
have, had she not long continued 
her search for the unkiio-Mn. 

" A N'ew Friend," a solo for 
the bass viol, met with great 
success. 

Signora Manninori showed 
great skill in the part where the 
old friendship is scorned and 
thrown aside for the new. The 
orchestral work is deserving of 
much praise. Each member 
worked as a unit, and showed 
considerable talent as a soloist. 



SOCIAL GOSSIP. 



The customary bunch of 
Easter engagements has been 
announced. Some of these, as 
usual, were a surprise to friends, 
and others had been looked for 
earlier in the season. 

Mrs. C. has sent out cards 
announcing the engagement of 
her daughter, M-b-l, to Bert 
W-ls-n. 

The long-lnoked-for S— m-n 
andT-U-ys engagement has been 
made public. 

Affections are often like 
mushionins, of ra])id growth. 
Another instance of this has 
been made public in the an- 
nounced engagement of M-b-l 
C-s- and Reg H- -ght-n. 



WEDDING BELLS. 

Notable Event in Social 
Circles. 

Bardhub and Bennet. 

A WEDDING which was an 
" event " in Lasell Society was 
that of Lee Bennet and Louisa 
Pallister Bardhub. The cere- 
mony was performed in the S.D. 
society room, the Hon. H. A. 
Holden officiating. Both beauty 
and charm were seen as the bride 
walked up the aisle of the beauti- 
fully decorated society room. 
Her costume consisted in white 
cotton de sole, the skirt with 
long court train, trimmed with 
point d'lreland. The bodice 
cut a la Russe, pointed front 
and back, and trimmed with des 
rubans floltantes. The costume 
was daintily concealed beneath 
the graceful folds of the veil, 
which was a marvel of beauty 
and size, eiu;ht yards being its 
length. The maid of honor 
seemed to have stepped from 
some painting, clad as she was 
in red crepe and white net, with 
ruchings of blue and green. 
The bridesmaids were all that 
art could make them. 

At the close of the ceremony 
all departs d to the home of the 
bride, where a reception was 
held. 



TREASON ! 



WANTS. 



Eating-Club in a 
Turmoil. 

Leading Member tried by 
Court Martial. 



A TEMPEST in the teapot 
has been brewing for some 
time among the members of 
Lasell Eating Club. It has 
resulted in a definite charge 
of treason against one of the 
leading members, and yester- 
day the case was tried. 

The case, hanging on a 
technical point concerning 
the interpretation of the con- 
stitution, was tried by those 
well versed. 

Treason according to the 
constitution is a wilful neg- 
lect of any duty of the club. 

Here is a case where the 
defendant is charged with 
carrying the resthetic in eat- 
ing too far and thus bringing 
the good name and honor of 
the club in disrepute. 

After an impartial trial the 
defendant, duly warned to 
keep in mind the good name 
of the association, was dis- 
charged. 



The Times Wants Pay. 
\Inserted in each edition.^ 

Wanted. — To exchange or 

sell, a job lot of stale poems and 
jokes. Prices reasonable. Also 
to purchase all back copies of 
Judge or Puck, having jokis 
suitable for class use. Call on 

J. A. H-LLS. 

Wanted, ^ Situation, by a 
competent and orderly person, 
as maid to put to rights school- 
girls' rooms. Call or address 
J-L- - Andks-n. 

Wanted. — The undersigned 
desires all young men who are 
looking for places to call, to 
address or see her at her resi 
dence any Monday P.M. 

H-LN M DSK-R. 

Wanted.— To buy, a portable 
and spacious wardrobe, yet one 
taking up no room. 

B-RR AND T-K-Y. 



Wanted. ■ 



Height. 
Miss H- ly. 



LOST AND FOUND. 

Lost. — A voice, rather high 
pitched and considerably used. 
The finder will be liberally 
rewarded and confer a great 
favor by leaving this, if found, 
at Room 70, Lasell. 

Lost. — A dark-brown crinkly 
switch, which disappeared very 
mysteriously. Finder will 
please make haste in returning 
it, as it is needed. Address 
N-LL- D-v-s. 

Found. — The undersigned is 
a constant finder of colds. All 
losers please call and prove 
ownership and pay charges. 
Miss M-cM-rt-n. 



GRAND CLEARANCE SALE. 
SPE.CIAT. PIRST OF A^PRIl. IiA.RGAI]VS. 

The Entire Stock oJ the Lost Drawer must be Slaughtered. 
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY. 

The stock is one of the most complete and varied ever shown. 
It includes pins, all kinds, second-hand pads, pencils, books, 
ribbons, gloves, rubbers, handkerchiefs, etc., etc., etc. 

The sale is to be held one day only. 

Come early and avoid the rush. 



ELECTION DAY AT LASELL 



November — , '92. 




W 



ILD excitement was rampant at quiet 
Lasell 
AVhen election time came round, 
And in all loyal hearts, I know full well, 
Woke patriotism most profound. 



Lasell, too, had its election day. 

And polls were set up in the gym ; 

Crowds thronged the portals for entrance- way, 

And cheers were raised with vim. 

'Twixt ''Republicans" and "Demmies" deep 

rivalry reigned. 
And high the mimic war rose, 
And deep was the hatred ever feigned 
By eager and spirited foes. 

" Those that laugh last, laugh the longest ! " 
In scorn "Baby Ruth's " side said ; 
" Though ' Baby McKee ' is the strongest. 
Yet girls always come out ahead." 



Long our sex has been kept in oppression ; 
That accounts for the errors we made. 
Though with blushes we make the confession. 
Some voted for " Ben " and free trade. 

Others, so eager to make their first vote. 
Even under the rope dared crawl ; 
But Mr. Rich, ever watchful invaders to note, 
Made them wait, or not vote at all. 



When the votes were counted and all was done, 
" What was the result? " do you say? 
Of course the school went for Harrison, 
Though the nation went not that way. 

Our candidate by the men was not elected, 
But we comfort ourselves with this thought. 
That when woman's rights are fully respected. 
The government will be as it ought. 



(98) 



WHAT THE ALLERLEI WOULD LIKE TO KNOW. 



Why Miss Couch is so fond of roses? 

Whetlier Coleridge had measles or chicken-pox when he broke out in verse? 
What was the trouble with the cups at the Senior table? 
Why there are not more graduates — when the Seniors have such a snap ? 
Who will be Miss SeiberHng's next mash? 
When the new Music Hall and Chapel will appear? 
Why a certain young lady has been dubbed " Porky " ? 
What kind of rouge Mr. Ryder uses ? 
Why Louise Hubbard smiles so on January 15 ? 
When the long-promised elevator will be put in? 

If "Twelfth Night" and "As You Like It" are one and the same play? 
How long since chrome-yellow has become a shade of pink? 
Who has the best stock of novels ? 
Who is Miss Homer? 
What has become of Ava's little curl? 

From what part of Shakespeare the following quotation is taken : " In the spring a young man's 
fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love "? 

If the Seniors in their appreciation of poetry do not include the poems of Keats? 

(99) 




FACULTY 



Charlie. — "Great men are not always wise." 

Caroline. — "Satire's my weapon." 

Doctor. — "Ihy fame is blown abroad from all the heights." 

EcKiE. — "I'm a creature made for night, not day." 

LiL. — "Panting time toiled after her in vain." 



Tioo) 



Herbie. — "Happy day that fixed my choice." 

J. Walter. — " Oh, how this discord doth afflict my soul ! " 

Lily. — "Order is heaven's first law." 

Mademoiselle. — "Speak freely what you think." 

Joseph. — " Don't put too fine a point to your wit for fear it should get blunted. 

Big Fraulein. — ^ 

> " Much may be said on both sides." 
LiTi'LE Fraulein. — ) 

WiTHiE. — "As merry as the day is long." 

A. B. — "There is none like her, none." 

Mrs. L. — " Nothing do I see in you 

That I can find should merit any hate." 

Willis. — "The very pink of courtesy." 

Henri Orne. — "They praised (?) him soft and low." 

Isabella. — "I trust I have not wasted breath." 

Mac. — "A shadow flits before me, 

Not thou, but like to thee." 

NuiTiE. — "There is something sublime in calm endurance." 



E. W-nsl-w. — " Too much of a- good thing." 
A. Cr-ck-r. — "All things cool with time." 
G. Sn-d-r. — " Smooth runs the water 

Where the brook is deep." 

(lOl) 



F. F — RCH-LD. — " My endeavours 

Have ever come too short of my desires." 
W. C-NL-N. — " At church, with meek and unaffected face, 
Her looks adorn the venerable place." 
C. R--S-NG. — "Which is the side I must go withal! 

I am with both." 
M. B-RR. — "I was ever of an opinion." 

E. Fl-m-ng. — " All the great are dying, and I'm not feeling very well." 
J. M-RPH-. — " Think of me as you please." 

E. P-RTR-DG-. — "My brain is drowned now — quite drowned." 

F. R-y. — "All things — I thought I knew." 
M. M-LL-R. — "Thou calm chaste scholar." 
E. Ch-s-. — "Too bright to live." 

H. P'-TCH. — " Thou art a scholar." 

N. W-STH — M-R. — "Yet by your gracious patience I will a round, unvarnished tale deliver of 

my whole course of love." 
A. -NDR--S-N — "She is well paid that is well satisfied." 
L. ZscH-TzscH-. — "Who loves not knowledge?" 
M. B-RN-RD. — "I charge thee, fling away ambition ; 

By that sin fell the angels." 
M. W-GG— N. — " Let gentleness my strong enforcement be." 
M. H-NS-N. — " Bashfulness is an ornament to youth and 

Silence is the perfect herald of joy." 
A. C-SH-NG. — "Think rather of work than of praise." 
M. St-n-. — "Thoughts and attitudes imperious." 
L. B-NN-TT. — " She'll grow up by and by." 

(102) 



H. St — L-. — " When you look sadly, it is for want of money." 
M. K — s-L. — "I have been studying how I may compare 

This prison where I live unto the world." 
L. R-CHM-ND. — " Of small anatomy and indefinite precocity." 
C. — DS. — ''What find I here?" 

L. T-CK-R. — "All conceit is not the same conceit." 
S. C-D-. — "I hourly learn a doctrine of obedience." 
C. M-NN-NG. — "I love my love because I know my love loves me. " 
F. G-RDN-R. — " Her voice is ever soft, gentle, and low. 

An excellent thing in woman." 
L. Wh-tn-y. — "1 vex my heart with fancies dim." 

F. C-s-B-LT. — "I tell you hopeless grief is passionless." 

M. T-ML-NS-N. — "Who ever loved that loved not at first sight?" 
L. B-LL. — "She looks like the afternoon shadow of somebody else." 
M. H — LY. — "Whence came I what I am?" 

A. McD-FF — . — "Therefore was I created with a stubborn outside, with an aspect of iron." 
E. R-Y. — "I hear, yet say not much, but think the more." 

G. St — RNS. — "The deed I intend is great. 

But what, as yet I know not." 

B. L-LL-BR-DG-. — "I'm sure care's an enemy to life." 

M. M-RG-N. — "Some that smile have in their hearts, I fear, miUions of mischief." 

A. R-WL-GH. — "I care for nobody — no, not I." 

H. C — K-. — "People of a lively imagination are always curious." 
M. W-RR-N. — " For her, her teacher's chair became a throne." 

B. P-NN-L. — " And shalt thou show us how divine a thing 

A woman may be made?" 

(103) 



D. H-RTS-N. — "They always talk who never think." 

C. J-HNS-N. — "Her tea she sweetens as she sips with scandal." 

A. W-LST-N. — " 'Tis not her hair, for sure in that 

There's nothing more than common ; 
And all her sense is only chat, 
Like any other woman." 

B. E-w-NG. — " Saying might you leave a world unsaid." 

H. Fr — B — . — " And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew 

That one small head should carry all [she thought] she knew." 
M. Cr — KSH-NK. — " The poets' darling." 

B. J-HNS-N. — " Thou hast mettle enough in thee to kill care." 
J. R-CH. — " Sighed and looked and sighed again. 

Sighed and looked unutterable things." 
Fr-nc-s H-lm-s. — " Talking, she knew not why, nor cared not why." 
G. G-SK-LL. — " And gentle dulness ever loves a joke." 

M. M — GS. — "There's no art to find the mind's construction in the face." 
G. J-HNS-N. — "Greatness knows itself." 
L. -pp-L. — " She would shake hands with a king upon his throne. 

And think it kindness to his majesty." 
Fl-r-nc- H-lm-s. — " One of the few immortal names 

That were not born to die." 
M. McD-N-LD. — "I have immortal longings in me." 
A. W-BB. — "She tells you flatly what her mind is." 
L. H-BB-RD. — "If ladies be but young and fair. 
They have the gift to know it." 

(104) 



E. C--CH. — "Alas, our young affections run to waste, 
Or water but the desert." 

A. N-BL-. — " Small, but — oh, ray ! " 

G. H-LM-s. — ''Personal beauty in a man was a sure passport to her Hking." 
E. P — L-. — ''Thou shouldst not have been old till thou hadst been wise." 

B. H-w-RD. — " Let me be that 1 am, and seek not to alter me." 

B. B-TT-RF- -LD. — " I would my horse had the speed of your tongue and so good a continuer." 
E. Stephenson. — " Figures that move, and almost speak." 

V. W-CK-FF. — "That same face of yours looks like the title page to a whole volume of roguery." 
M. G-G-. — " But she was calm and sad, musing always 

On loftiest enterprise." 
S. B-ND. — "I cannot hide what I am." 
G. L — D. — "I never did repent for doing good. 

Nor shall not now." 
E. Mc-CHR-N. — "For man is a giddy thing, and this is my conclusion." 
N. D-v-s. — "I am nothing if not critical. " 

C. S-w-N. - " They sin who tell us love can die." 
H. H-LD-N. — "Uncertain, coy, and hard to please." 

M. Sm-th. — " Perfect in grammar and in rhetoric nice." 
U. K-NG. — " Can it be 

That this is all remains of thee?" 
B. H — GH. — " My mind is like a fountain stirred, 

And I myself see not the bottom of it." 
M. R-NN — . — " Modest she seems, not shy." 
A. M-LL-R. — "Her step was royal, queenlike." 
J. W-ST. — "She is not yet so old but she may learn." 

C105) 



M. F-ss-ND-N. — "I will be the pattern of all patience: I will say nothing." 

F. J — NN-s. — "Courage and comfort! All shall yet go well." 
M. Cr-ck-r. — " My man's as true as steel." 

N. R-CH-RDS. — " Ah ! when I see that smile appear 

My heart again is filled with cheer." 
J. H-GG. — "The worst fault you have is to be in love." 
W, B-ss. — "True, I chirp for lack of soul." 
E. Wh-t-. — " Conscience is harder than our enemies." 

A. Cl — ^v-L-ND. — "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" 
J. F-TCH. — " I carry my unwritten poems on my face." 

H. L-w-s. — "Pride goes before a fall." 

M. M — G-N. — "Thou mayest see a 'sunshine and a hail in me at once." 

M. V-N P-IT-N. — " Shut up 

In measureless content." 
E. S-MNS. — " Thy tongue runs on as usual like a mill 

When the river is its fullest." 
-MM- P L-. — "People of a lively imagination are generally curious, and always so when a 

little in love." 
I. M-RR-w. — "As headstrong as an allegory on the banks of the Nile." 

B. F-WL-R. — "Castles in the air cost a vast deal to keep up." 

G. -LL-N. — "Be ruled by time, the wisest counsellor of all." 
L. Pr-ct-r. — "I stand in meek contrition here." 

H. N-BL-. — "A 7to^/e dream, what was it else I saw?" 

M. Warner. — "Be modest, allay thy ecstasy, in measure ruin thy joy." 

M. -ST-N. — "Make no man your idol!" 

(106) 



M. C-S-. — '' Our vanities differ as our noses do." 

E. Sc LL-R. — "I am willing, I am ready," 

I would learn, if you would teach." 
B. W-LS-N. — "Thou foster child of Silence and slow Time." 
E. H-LL. — " And most of all would I flee from the cruel madness of love. 
E. L-BB-. — "All studies here I solemnly defy." 
J. -RN-LD. — "I found you hid from prying eyes. 

Quiet, and you blushed in sweet surprise." 
M. L-THR-p. — " Society is no comfort to one not sociable." 
J. J-HNS-N. — "Better late than never." 
J. H-YT. — " But for those affections, 

Those pleasant recollections, 
What should I be?" 
A. H-NN-. — (^"So we'll go no more a-roving 
R. S-NK — . — (^ So late into the night." 

A. H — GHT-N. — "Her hands und feet vas schmall und need, 

Und venn dot maiden sings, 
Dem leedle birds dey glose deir eyes 
Und flob deir leedle vings." 

0. H-LM-s. — "I am not lean enough to be thoiight a good student ! " 
M. L-T-s. — " She is an earthly paragon." 

1. Sh-rt. — " He who has a superlative for everything wants 

A measure for the great or small." 
M-LL — T — L-R. — " There are no men to conquer in this wood ; 

That makes my only woe." 

C107) 



R. S — B-RL-NG. — "How happy I'd be with either, 

Were t'other fair charmer away." 
M. D — . — "Slie's a good creature." 
B. M-RR-M-N. — "I have an exposition of sleep come upon me." 

F. D-w. — "What do you think of me?" 
S. H — D-N. — "Loquacity itself thou art." 

B. C-MST-CK. — "Take care not to burden your day with more than its share." 
M. T-LL — s. — "When as a Uttle child I stubbed my toe: 
Alas, alas, for I have stubbed my heart ! " 
H. Sc-TT. — "So wise, so young, they say, do never live long." 
J. -ND-RS-N. — "Your own way, your own say, then you are happy." 
L. C-MST-CK. — "Her lips have said the last kind words her lips could ever say." 

B. Sh-ph-rd. — "A slave to the tyrant, fashion!" 
L. T-K — . — "There's nothing half so sweet in life 

As love's young dream." 
H. M-DSK-R. — "Hush, don't disturb her, she's hunting for an idea." 

G. S-TH-RL-ND. — "Never known to be in a hurry." 
M-BL- T — L-R. — "I think it's so because I think it's so." 

C. G-LM-N. — "With mincing step, small voice, and languid eye." 

M. S — M-N. — "Weather, wind, and women's mind change like the wind." 

G. D-v- s. — " The very commonest ideas that pass through her mind seem vested with a 

wonderful frcs/wessy 
G. RoBB. — "Wisdom shall die with you." 
J. Ch-ndl-r. — "There is little of the melancholy element in her." 

(io8) 



M. St-w-rt. — "What silence, too, came with the snow, and what seclusion!" 

A. K-LL-GG. — "Oh, she will sing the savageness out of a bear." 

B. R-p-R. — "My sentence is for open war." 

C. S-MPS-N. — "Aye, it is true, we do not die of love." 

B. Sh-nn-n. — " Speak little and to the point, and you will pass for somebody." 
J. W-TS-N. — "Forbear, and eat no more." 




SCRAPS LEFT OVER FROM OUR FEAST OF QUOTATIONS. 



Lasell. — " Where none admire, 'tis useless to excel ; 

Where none are beaux, 'tis vain to be a belle." 
Elevator. — " 'Tis a thing I have desired long to see." 

French Class. — " It is better to pardon too much than to condemn too much." 
Lost Drawer. — " Of every reverend reputation. 

Of credit infinite, highly beloved." 
Linen Room. — "Oh! reform it altogether." 

School Clock. — "That clock upbraids me with the waste of time." 
New Girls. — "To thee and thy company we bade a hearty welcome." 
Saturday Dinner. — " The accident of an accident." 
Homesick Girl. — " How short our happy days appear ! 

How long the sorrowful ! " 
Allerlei. — " What is writ is writ ; 

Would it were worthier." 

(no) 



INDEX 



Lasell Building 
Edward Lasell . . 
Charles C Bragdon 
Dedication . . . 
Ninety-four . . . 
Editors .... 
Preface .... 
Board of Trustees 
Faculty .... 
Freshman Quotation 
Freshman Register 
Freshman History 
Sophomore Qiiotation 
Sophomore Register 
Sophomore Histor 
Junior Quotation 
Junior Register 
Junior Historj' . 
Senior Quotation 
Senior Register 



PAGE 
12 

H 
15 
16 

17 
20 

21 

23 
24 
27 
29 

30 

33 
35 
36 
37 
41 
42 

45 
47 



PAGE 

Senior History 48 

Irregulars 50 

In Memoriam 54 

S. D. Society 55 

Lasellia Club 57 

Instrumental Club .... 59 

Dress Cutting 60 

Christian Associations ... 61 

Swimmers 62 

Lasell Battalion . . . . . 63 

Military Department ... 65 

Medical Department .... 66 

Leaves 68 

Studio 69 

Lasellia Forever 70 

Our S. D 71 

Eating Club ....... 72 

Families 75 

Cooking Classes 76 



PAGE 

A Wonderful Tale .... 77 

Senior Statistics 78 

Ode to the High and Mighty 

Seniors 79 

Orphean Club 80 

Pianoforte Qimrtettes ... 81 

French Club 82 

What Luck ! 83 

Nos Mouvements Giratoires . 84 

The Faculty Poem .... 85 

Natatorium 90 

Grocery Store 91 

Love's Sweet Dream ... 92 

April Times 96 

Election Day 98 

What the Alierlei would like 

to know 99 

Grinds — Faculty 100 

Grinds — Miscellaneous . . 103 



("3) 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Baker, Walter, & Co. 
Bates, Dr. G. A. . . 



PAGE 

123 

118 

Bent & Bush 122 

Bouquet, Millinery 7 

Capstick, Wm 118 

Central Dry Goods Store 10 

Clapp, Otis, & Son 123 

Columbia Bicycles 127 

Cobb, Aldrich, & Co 4 

Dame, Stoddard, & Kendall 117 

Estey Organ Co 115 

French, Benj 123 

Fritz, Odin 119 

Frost & Adams 116 

Goldthwait, Joel, & Co i2i 

Grace, Mrs. J. J 7 

Hallet & Davis 124 

Hollander, L. P., & Co . 3 

Hollings, R 7 

Jenkins, O. A., & Co 9 

Johonnot, Harris E 119 

Lally & Collins 120 

Lamb, C. J 5 

Lawrence, Wilde, & Co 122 

Lloyd, Andrew J 122 



PAGE 

Long, Thos., & Co 121 

Macurdy, R. W 6 

Mason & Risch Vocalion Co 115 

McFarlin, Geo. R 7 

Oliver Ditson Company 116 

Parker House 9 

Phillips & Collins, Misses 120 

Plummer, Geo. A 120 

Pond's Extract Company 123 

Pope Mfg. Co 127 

Pray, John H., Sons, & Co 2 

Rockwell &: Churchill 117 

Shepard, Norwell, & Co 121 

Simonds, J. P., & Co 120 

Skinner, Alvah, & Son 122 

Springer Brothers 126 

St. Clair 120 

Stearns, R. H., & Co 8 

Tonica Springs Company 125 

Vickers, E 114 

Wadsworth, Howland, & Co 121 

Wallingford, Mrs. L. F 119 

Wethern, Geo. M. ; 7 

Whitford & Johnson 119 

Young's Hotel . 9 



(114) 





^ 



169 TRBMONT STRJBBT, 



BOSTON. 




Mason k Riscti Tocalion Co. 

VOCALIONS. 



For Churches, Chapels, Schools 
and Music Rooms. 






The Only REAL SUBSTITUTE 



FOR A GOOD 
PIPE ORGAN 



-^i^:- 

-7?^ 



Send for Prices and Catalogue, 

containing testimonials from eminent Musicians, fully 
substantiating the claim 



Boston Warerooms : New York Warerooms 

151-153 Tremont St. 10 East i6th St. 

Factory at Worcester, Mass. 



The Vocalion is Used at Lasell Seminary. 



("5) 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



•^ il/' >!/■ iSr 



l&ccomtii^c ^vi (§001)0 of aff kini)i\ 

HAND BOOKS OF INSTRUCTION ON ALL ART SUBJECTS. 

Supplies lor Oil Color, later Color, CMna, Lustra, and Tapestry Painting. 
Stndies for all firancles ot Art WorR, 

Jvlathematical Instruments, DrawinEi Paper, and T Squares, 

■^ \^ ^Ir "ilr 

Brcbitects' auD Bncjineers' Supplies 

IN GENERAL. 



Picture; Kraniing in All Styles. 



^7 CoRNHiLL, Boston, Mass. 



Catalogues frse on applicalian, Mail orders receive prompt attention, 



F. S. FROST. 



H. C. GARDNER. H. A. LAWRENCE. 



• • • 111 C^ • • • 

"WORLD'S FAIR" 

SERIES OF 

MUSIC BOOKS. 

Designed in Connection with the World's Fair. 

The Vkkdict of the Press and Critics is that "No such 
Books have ever before been issued at the Price." The Volumes 
are: — 

" World's Fair Piano=Music Collection." 

Nocturnes, Reveries, Morceaux, etc. 31 compositions; handsome 
title-page in colors. Large sheet music size; 144 pages. 

"World's Fair March Collection," 
for the Piano. 

Stands at the htad of all similar collections. 39 marches. Large 
slieet music size; handsome title-page in colors; 144 pages. 

"World's Fair Ballad Collection." 

A veritable feast of melody from beginning to end. 38 Ballads; 
large sheet music size; 144 pages. 

"World's Fair Dance=Music Collection." 

A?i admirable hook of brig'ht, spirited,, popzilar music; 36 dances; 
large sheet music size; handsome title-page in colors; 144 pages. 

"World's Fair Song and Chorus Collection." 

A collection of songs (with four-part chorus to each) from the most 
popular composers. 44 pieces; handsome title-page in colors; 144 pages. 

Any volume sent postpaid on receipt of price. 



Heavy Paper, $1.00 ; Boards, $1.25; Cloth Gilt, $2.00. 



"American Patriotic Songs." 

A splendid collection of carefully selected national lyrics, words and 
music complete. There are nearly sixty selections, songs, hymns, etc. 
It will satisfy all who desire the music of our native land, in this con- 
venient and clieap form. Price 50 cents, postpaid. 

,fUST ISSUED. 

" World's Fair Collection of Patriotic Songs and 
Airs of Different Nations." 

51 FamoMS National Airs of the 30 great nations, never before 
brought together into one volume. The cover bears an engraving of 
the National Flag of each country. 50 cents, postpaid. 

Send for free lists of College Songs for Girls, — the "New Hai-vard 
Song Book," and a full list of College Song Books. 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY, 

Hf»aHn IIJl ff ffC ■'^°'* Sheet Music, Music Books, and 
• '»^**WM •-**** LCI a j^LL Musical Merchandise. 

453=463 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

C. II. DITSON & CO., 867 Broadway, N. Y. 



(116) 



Dame, Stoddard I Kendall, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR ... 



CUTLERY, FISHING TACKLE, 
FINE LEATHER GOODS, 



LAWN TENNIS, 
GYMNASIUM SUPPLIES, 



KODM... CAMERAS- •HAWKEYE 



PHOTOGRAPH WORK FOR AMATEURS A SPECIALTY. 



m WASHINGTON STREET. BOSTON. 



^1 



MAKERS OF FINE BOOKS LIKE THE ''ALLET{LEI," Etc. 



("7) 



E. VICKERS, 



DEALER IN 



(!xROGKRfEB, 

FLOUR OF ALL GRADES. 
SELECTED TEAS, 

FURe correes nnv SFices. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 
CANNED FRUITS IN VARIETY. 

Also, a Comi-lute Assortment of Goods usually kej't in a 
Fiust-Class Stoke. 

Goods (lolivcrcd iiiomptly, free of expense. 

297 Auburn Street, opposite Depot, 
AUBURlSrDALK. 

AVM. CAPSTICK, 



piopist, 



ASPEN AVENUE, 



AUBURNDALE. 






Wedding Decorations and Funeral Emblems 
at shortest notice. 

Also, 

BEDDING PLANTS, 

CUT ROSES and CARNATIONS, 
A SPECIALTY. 



pisses Pl?i11ip5 & Collins, 



DRESS AND CLOAK MAKERS, 



CMILD3' BLOCK, 



AUBLIRN STREET 



^uburnfeale. )J}/^Q55. 



(5eo. H. Bates, B.B.S. 

All Branches of Dental Work 



CAREFULLY PERFORMED. 



tlbcrpc 1f>ouse, 



MAPLE STREET, 



OFFICE HOURS; 

9 A, M. TO S P. M. 



HuburuDalc, /IDass. 



(ii8) 



ODIN FRIT^ 

PttOTOGRftFtteR. 



358 CKNTRK STREKX, 



NEWTON, MASS. 






" The success of Mr. Fritz is due entirely to good work." 



WHITFORD & JOHNSON, 



jBWGlry 



MANUFACTURING OPTICIANS. 



UIHITFORD BUIliDIIvlG, 



663 MAIN STREET, 

WALTHAM, MASS. 



I\rs. n p. Wallingford, 
i^odi^te, 

37s Centre Street, 

Warner's BlocH, 

Newton, Ra'^^. 



?< 



HARRIS E. JOHONNOT, 

ELECTRICIAN. 
INCANDESCENT LIGHTING. 

Electric Bells, Annunciators, Burglar Alarms, Gas Lighting 
Apparatus, Speaking Tubes. 

All kinds of Electrical Apparatus Installed or Repaired. 
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES. 

Estimates furnished for Conriplete Installation of Isolated Plants. 




NEWTON, MASS. 

OPP. FREE LIBRARY. 

Telephone Connection. 




("9) 



Geo. a. Plummer 

60 Co. 



liRDlES', IVEISSES', 

AND CHlliDJ^EH'S 
OUTFITTEfJS. 



OUTSIDE GARMENTS, • TEA GOWNS, 

COSTUMES, W^RAPPERS, 

AND BOYS' CLOTHING. 



WAISTS, 
INFANTS' WEAR, 



jy[ackintnshfis and graliRnstte garments a |pemaltij. 

We are the Largest Specialty Garment House in the Country, and never allow ourselves to be undersold. 

531 f 533 Vb.5Kin^fon S^reel, Boston, ^^55. 



LALLY ^ eOLLlN5, 

RETA1LEK5, 



liadies' and Childfcti's Outfits, 
liadies' and Children's pufnishing Goods. 

You can purchase of us anything you 

want or wear in Dry Goods 

.... The best goods and the lowest 
prices in the City 



WA5HINQT0N 6- BEbFOKb 6T5. 
B05T0N, t\kSS, 



J. P. SIMON DS (Sc CO. 



oOo oOo 

oOO oQO y/Ji 



FINE HALF-TONES 

ON COPPER, 
BY OUR NEW METHOD. 



Photo 

Engravers, 

Designing and 

Illustrating 



SiMONDS' New process for fine 

RELIEF WORK. 



247 washington street, 
Boston. 



(120) 



Outfits 



FOR OIL, WATER COLOR, CHINA, 
PASTEL AND TAPESTRY PAINTING, 
CHARCOAL, CRAYON AND PENCIL 
DRAWING 

Drafting 
Instruments ^ 

AND SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS. 
Send for our latest Catalogue. 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co. 

82 & 84 Washington St., Boston. 

THOMAS LONG & CO. 

77 SUMMER STREET, 

BOSTON. 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 



Novelties ! 
Novelties ! 






JEWELRY 



OK ALL KINDS. 



GOLD. — Solid and Plated. 
SILVER.— Sterling and Plated. 

Hair Ornaments of every description. 

Sterling Silver, Tortoise Shell, &c., &c. 



Thomas Long, 
Boston. 



Fkank F. D.widson, 
Auburnctalc. 



JOEL QOLDTIiWAIT &- C2. 



nriE CAKPET5 | 

AHt> M 

I ORlEriTAL RCJQ5, I 



162 T2 169 WA5HmQT0N 5TREET, 

« 

B05T0N. 



ShEuar 



wgU & 



Importers of 

RIBBONS, 
LACES, 
AND KID GLOVES. 

Headquarters for 

Hath E WAY'S 

FINE UNDERWEAR. 
Winter Street & Temple Place, 



BOSTON. 



(121) 



The New Three Bar Spring 

IN GOLD AND STEEL. 




This spring combined with the Fox Nose-Ciamps we consider 

the best fitting- device for astigmatic eye-glasses 

yet introduced. 

ANDREW J. LLOYD, 

Prescription Optician, Sole Agent. 

323 & 325 Washington St., Boston. 

Opposite the Old South Church. 
Branch, 454 Boylston Street, Y. M.C. A. Building. 



BENT & BUSH, 



a 



£)iainonbs 



a 



AND OTHER PRECIOUS STONES. 



Yah Skinner & Son 



iATTDRS flm i'URRIDRS. 



Manufacturers of 



» «APS •» 



IN ALL SHAPES. 



387 WASHINOTON ST. 



BOSTON. 



6 Wii^ter Street, 



Up On. Fli(5[il, 



Lawrence, Wilde & Co. 



Manufacturers of First-Class 



•:• FURNITURE •:• 



. . . AND . 



INTERIOR DeOORMTIONS, 



NOS. ^8 TO 48 CORNHILL, 



BOSTON. 



Wm. II. Hull. 
F. D. Wilde. 
Geo. B. Darrow. 



(122) 



OEMAND POND'S 
EXTRACT. AVOID 
ALL IMITATIONS. 




FAC-SIWIILE OF 

BOTTLE WITH 
BUFF WRAPPER. 



ALL PAIN 
H-lxoiJLixxa-tisiaiii. 



It \7%r±±l Oixr©. 



Photoqraphic 

OUTKITS 
KOR ANIAXKURS. 

Largest and Best Selected Stock 

IN the East 

Expert Instruction Free to Patrons, 

/IN 

Benj. French & Co. 

319 Washington Street, Opposite Milk Street, 
BOSTON. 



Use SAPODONE for the Teeth. 



'I iiiiiiii 



SAPODONE is the trade name for a liquid, saponaceous dentrifice 
which is giving- perfect satisfaction to those that use it. It contains 
no injurious ingredients, or substance, the use of which the most 
exacting dentist could not fully approve. 

It cleanses the teeth and sweetens the breath, and* leaves a cool, re- 
freshing sensation in the mouth. 

We desire to call your attention to this preparation, and invite you 
to give it a trial. 

DIRECTIONS FOR USE. 
First wet the brush, then add a small quantity of Sapodone, and 
apply to the teeth in the usual manner. 

Sapodone is put up in two sizes: 2-ounce vial, price 35 cents; 7,!4- 
ounce vial, price 50 cents. 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

OTIS CLAPP & SON, 



10 Park Square, 

BOSTON. 



307 Westminster Street, 

Providence. 



Unlike the Dutch Process 

No Alkalies 

— OB — 

Other Chemicals 

are used in the 
preparation of 

W. BAKER & CO.'S 

reakfastCocoa 

which is absolutely 
\ pure and soluble. 

It lias morethan three times 
I the strength of Cocoa mixed 
j with Starch, Arrowroot or 
__ ' Sugar, and is far more eco- 
nomical, costing less than one cent a cup. 
It is delicious, nourishing, and EASILY 

DIGESTED. 

Sold by Grocers everywhtr*. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mais. 




(123) 



YOUNG LADIES 

. . . WHO ARE . . . 

(Sand^^ Qaievs and ^oc^a X^^inlicrs 

. . . PATRONIZE . . . 

ST. CLAIR & CO. 

^riresh and J^olicious ^onfeciionsr'tj and ^oda. 
We make it our constant aim to eater to the wants of the most fastidious tastes. 

ALL OUR CANDIES AND PURE FRUIT JUICE SYRUPS 
MADE ON OUR PREMISES. 

SPECIAL CARE TAKEN ^A^ITH MAIL AND EXPRESS ORDERS. 

(Sot. '^emple ^lacQ and X^asMngton S'^'f 

BOSTON. 

HALLET & DXVISr" 

THE LEADING BOSTON PIANO 

manufacturers, invite you to send for their new Catalogue !Mo. 31, if you 
contemplate the purchase of a piano. They will send you a piano— no 
matter where you live, and guarantee satisfaction. They will accept pay- 
ment in small instalments if you prefer. The Hallet &. Davis Piano is 
not an experiment; it has boen established and favorably known 

FOR MORE THAN FIFTY YEARS 

and the Hallet &. Davis warranty is known in Boston and New England to 
be as reliable as a government bond. Send for circulars, describing 
scientific accuracy of construction, third pedal for noiseless practice, 
wonderful depth of tone, testimonials from Liszt, Abt, Strauss and 
others, and record of 85 First Premiums. Full particulars free. 

HALLET $( DAVIS COMPANY, 

179 TREMONT STREET - - - - BOSTON. 

(124) 



Mhc . . . 



Question 
of Health 



0illl(r9 



IS 




is one of serious import to the young woman seeking 
a higher education. Will her nerves stand the strain? 
Is her system in condition to honor the drafts which 
a course at Seminary or College is sure to present? 
Unless an affirmative answer be given these, there is 
but one way to achieve her ambition. 



The regular use of HIGHLAND TO NIC A WATER 

will supply all deficiency of nerve force, and restore the 
physical organs to their normal condition. 



Phy 



SlC13.riS S3.y that Tonica has an advantage over other medicinal 
waters in being such a 



Delicious 

Table 

Water. 



This means a great 
deal when its constant 
use is desirable, 
especially to ladies 
whose tastes are delicate. 

(125) 



The Tonica Springs Record 



TELLS ALL ABOUT IT. 



Sample copy mailed on request. 

THE TONICA SPRINGS CO. 

Highland Park, Conn. 



springer Brothers— 



IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
DEALERS IN 



Seasonable Garments in great 
variety. 

Prices very reasonable for reliable 
goods. 

Discount to teachers and students 

of the leading educational 
institutions. 



Fashionable Cloaks 



FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILDREN. 



We cordially invite all ladies 
interested in seeing beautiful goods 
to visit our establishment and in- 
spect the large variety of Fashionable 
Capes, Outing Suits, Coats, Jackets, 
&c., displayed in the various de- 
partments on the upper floors. 




500 WASHINGTON STREET, CORNER BEDFORD, 

BOSTON. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR FASHIONABLE GARMENTS. 



Carriage Entrance, 10 and 12 Bedford Street. 

(126) 




Columbia Bicycles 
For Women... 



e) ® 



Of all pastimes bicycling is becoming the most popular, 
and of all bicycles the Columbia is best=liked among women, 
for the modern Columbia removes all objections to riding, 
and is light, strong and beautiful. 

Ample choice in Ladies' Columbias with cushion tires at 
$110, and pneumatic tires at $115, $125 and $150. 



® e) ® @ @ 



Our Catalogue is free at our agencies, and sent 
by mail for two two=cent stamps. 



Pope nfg. Co. 



BOSTON, NEW YORK, CHICAGO, HARTFORD. 

(127)